University of Rochester

University of Rochester

University of Rochester

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Self-Recording Video Tutorial: How to Look and Sound Your Best

 If you're looking to record yourself on video, but don't know where to start, here are four tips to get you going. Whether you're recording on a laptop or desktop computer, mobile device, or any type of camera, this tutorial is designed to help you find the right location and setup so you can feel comfortable with the technology and focus on your message. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Self-Recording Video Tutorial: How to Look and Sound Your Best

 5 gün önce

 If you're looking to record yourself on video, but don't know where to start, here are four tips to get you going. Whether you're recording on a laptop or desktop computer, mobile device, or any type of camera, this tutorial is designed to help you find the right location and setup so you can feel comfortable with the technology and focus on your message. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Love Letters to MAG: Judith Schaechter, "Three-Tiered Cosmos"

 What do you do when you're away from your love? Send a love letter of course. We're sharing our love letters to our favorite works of art from the Memorial Art Gallery, and bringing them directly to you. Jess Marten, the curator in charge and curator of American art at the Memorial Art Gallery shares her thoughts on Judith Schaechter's "Three Tiered Cosmos," a piece from the exhibit she helped to organize, "The Path to Paradise: Judith Schaechter's Stained Glass Art." With deep respect for history, a provocative rebelliousness, and a feminist sensibility, Judith Schaechter has aptly been called a “post-punk stained-glass sorceress.” Her stained-glass panels are mouth-watering seductions, alternative visions of beauty, and radical statements of female experience. Schaechter says about her work: “The ultimate motivator for me is the euphoric feeling of having “nailed it” by doing justice to some preposterously breathtaking inspiration. That is the most ecstatic euphoria I have ever experienced.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/C02fT/

Love Letters to MAG: Judith Schaechter, "Three-Tiered Cosmos"

 6 gün önce

 What do you do when you're away from your love? Send a love letter of course. We're sharing our love letters to our favorite works of art from the Memorial Art Gallery, and bringing them directly to you. Jess Marten, the curator in charge and curator of American art at the Memorial Art Gallery shares her thoughts on Judith Schaechter's "Three Tiered Cosmos," a piece from the exhibit she helped to organize, "The Path to Paradise: Judith Schaechter's Stained Glass Art." With deep respect for history, a provocative rebelliousness, and a feminist sensibility, Judith Schaechter has aptly been called a “post-punk stained-glass sorceress.” Her stained-glass panels are mouth-watering seductions, alternative visions of beauty, and radical statements of female experience. Schaechter says about her work: “The ultimate motivator for me is the euphoric feeling of having “nailed it” by doing justice to some preposterously breathtaking inspiration. That is the most ecstatic euphoria I have ever experienced.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/C02fT/

Supporting an Unconventional Path to Teaching

 Emily Collins '20W and Devan Carter '20W have two things in common. Both of their mothers are teachers, and they are each pursuing that same path toward having their own classroom. To pursue that passion of shaping young minds, they also both decided that the Warner School of Education was the best place for them to achieve that goal. Neither one of them took the conventional route to get there. For Collins, although she grew up spending a lot of time in school helping her mom prepare her classroom, teaching was not the career she saw for herself. "I actually didn't want to be a teacher for a long time," says Collins. "I have teachers in my family, and I kind of wanted to go out and do something different." She majored in international relations as an undergraduate, and then seeking a new adventure abroad, found herself teaching English in Thailand. "I was supposed to be there for six months, and I stayed for a year and a half instead, because I just totally fell in love with it." Devan Carter similarly found himself looking for just the right path after graduating from Rutgers University. After talking with his mother and running into some of his high school football coaches who also were teachers, he thought he’d give teaching a try. “I had the opportunity to start substituting in the Rochester City School District. And through that, fell in love with it.” For many students who don’t get an education degree or teaching certification as an undergraduate, the Teaching and Curriculum program at Warner presents an opportunity to get the expertise and support they need to be successful in their own classroom. And they can do it in just about a year. These students say not only is Warner giving them the knowledge they need to be an elementary school teacher, but they appreciate the supportive community environment at Warner, and the emphasis on social justice. “The Warner School, it really shows you what's the purpose of everything you do,” remarks Devan Carter. “If the students were the vehicle, I would be the road. Hopefully I can shape you in a good path or the path that would make you the most successful in life.” “I feel inspired by the professors in this program, and the people that I've met through the program,” adds Collins. “I feel more equipped, now more than ever, from the experiences that I've had at Warner to handle my own classroom.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Supporting an Unconventional Path to Teaching

 Aylar önce

 Emily Collins '20W and Devan Carter '20W have two things in common. Both of their mothers are teachers, and they are each pursuing that same path toward having their own classroom. To pursue that passion of shaping young minds, they also both decided that the Warner School of Education was the best place for them to achieve that goal. Neither one of them took the conventional route to get there. For Collins, although she grew up spending a lot of time in school helping her mom prepare her classroom, teaching was not the career she saw for herself. "I actually didn't want to be a teacher for a long time," says Collins. "I have teachers in my family, and I kind of wanted to go out and do something different." She majored in international relations as an undergraduate, and then seeking a new adventure abroad, found herself teaching English in Thailand. "I was supposed to be there for six months, and I stayed for a year and a half instead, because I just totally fell in love with it." Devan Carter similarly found himself looking for just the right path after graduating from Rutgers University. After talking with his mother and running into some of his high school football coaches who also were teachers, he thought he’d give teaching a try. “I had the opportunity to start substituting in the Rochester City School District. And through that, fell in love with it.” For many students who don’t get an education degree or teaching certification as an undergraduate, the Teaching and Curriculum program at Warner presents an opportunity to get the expertise and support they need to be successful in their own classroom. And they can do it in just about a year. These students say not only is Warner giving them the knowledge they need to be an elementary school teacher, but they appreciate the supportive community environment at Warner, and the emphasis on social justice. “The Warner School, it really shows you what's the purpose of everything you do,” remarks Devan Carter. “If the students were the vehicle, I would be the road. Hopefully I can shape you in a good path or the path that would make you the most successful in life.” “I feel inspired by the professors in this program, and the people that I've met through the program,” adds Collins. “I feel more equipped, now more than ever, from the experiences that I've had at Warner to handle my own classroom.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

NROTC at Rochester: 75 Years of Service

 The NROTC was established by Congress in 1926, with units housed at six colleges. Today, more than 150 colleges and universities offer programs. Rochester’s unit was an offshoot of the V-12 Navy College Training Program, formed in 1943 at the height of World War II to train future military officers at campuses across the United States. The V-12 program was phased out when the war ended two years later, but military leaders decided to expand its NROTC programs from 27 to 52 to replace Naval officers who would be leaving. Rochester joined Cornell, Columbia, Dartmouth, Nebraska, Oregon State, and Villanova among the 25 colleges and universities selected. The nation’s escalating involvement in the Vietnam War-and the student protests that followed-took its toll on NROTC programs in the 1960s. While Rochester’s program survived, others at major universities did not. In 1968, arsonists burned Stanford’s NROTC building to the ground. The school began phasing out its program and terminated it in 1973. More programs disbanded in 1970 following the shooting deaths of four students by National Guard soldiers at Kent State. Harvard terminated its program in 1971, in the wake of antiwar protests. Forty years passed before the program was reinstated. At Rochester, the battalion was around 180 at the start of the 1960s. By 1966, when nearly 400,000 American troops were in Vietnam, that number had dropped to 60. By the late 1960s, Rochester’s NROTC students were subjected to heckling, and carried on amidst protests, criticism in the Campus Times student newspaper, and hearings between faculty and students questioning the program’s very existence. History professor Arthur Mitzman called for its abolition, saying, “The University should have no connection with military affairs . . . or play any partisan roles in quarrels between nations.” With low enrollment came a major change. In 1973, Rochester became one of 56 schools to accept women into its NROTC program-part of the Navy’s effort to end sexual discrimination. Four women joined. By 1977, only nine of the 170 midshipmen-just 5 percent-were women. This year, 23 of the 81 midshipmen (28 percent) are women. As part of an agreement among Rochester-area institutions to share resources, the current Rochester NROTC unit includes students from the Rochester Institute of Technology, SUNY Brockport, and St. John Fisher College. Students who take part in ROTC training for the Army and Air Force are in a program based at RIT. About 50 Rochester students are enrolled in NROTC and another 11 are in the ROTC program at RIT. In order to be part of the NROTC program, students must successfully apply for a Navy or Marines scholarship, then earn acceptance into a college of their choice. Throughout their college careers, NROTC students take naval sciences courses, ranging from Seapower and Maritime Affairs to Leadership and Ethics. Most days start at 6 a.m. with physical training or close-order drills. The drills include physical challenges like rope climbing, pushups, pullups, and grappling, as well as running while carrying a fellow student or swimming while attached to a cinder block. Rochester also competes each year in drill and fitness competitions against other programs, hosted by Cornell and Villanova. Read the full story: www.rochester.edu/pr/Review/V82N2/0502_nrotc.html Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/C0Hky/

NROTC at Rochester: 75 Years of Service

 Aylar önce

 The NROTC was established by Congress in 1926, with units housed at six colleges. Today, more than 150 colleges and universities offer programs. Rochester’s unit was an offshoot of the V-12 Navy College Training Program, formed in 1943 at the height of World War II to train future military officers at campuses across the United States. The V-12 program was phased out when the war ended two years later, but military leaders decided to expand its NROTC programs from 27 to 52 to replace Naval officers who would be leaving. Rochester joined Cornell, Columbia, Dartmouth, Nebraska, Oregon State, and Villanova among the 25 colleges and universities selected. The nation’s escalating involvement in the Vietnam War-and the student protests that followed-took its toll on NROTC programs in the 1960s. While Rochester’s program survived, others at major universities did not. In 1968, arsonists burned Stanford’s NROTC building to the ground. The school began phasing out its program and terminated it in 1973. More programs disbanded in 1970 following the shooting deaths of four students by National Guard soldiers at Kent State. Harvard terminated its program in 1971, in the wake of antiwar protests. Forty years passed before the program was reinstated. At Rochester, the battalion was around 180 at the start of the 1960s. By 1966, when nearly 400,000 American troops were in Vietnam, that number had dropped to 60. By the late 1960s, Rochester’s NROTC students were subjected to heckling, and carried on amidst protests, criticism in the Campus Times student newspaper, and hearings between faculty and students questioning the program’s very existence. History professor Arthur Mitzman called for its abolition, saying, “The University should have no connection with military affairs . . . or play any partisan roles in quarrels between nations.” With low enrollment came a major change. In 1973, Rochester became one of 56 schools to accept women into its NROTC program-part of the Navy’s effort to end sexual discrimination. Four women joined. By 1977, only nine of the 170 midshipmen-just 5 percent-were women. This year, 23 of the 81 midshipmen (28 percent) are women. As part of an agreement among Rochester-area institutions to share resources, the current Rochester NROTC unit includes students from the Rochester Institute of Technology, SUNY Brockport, and St. John Fisher College. Students who take part in ROTC training for the Army and Air Force are in a program based at RIT. About 50 Rochester students are enrolled in NROTC and another 11 are in the ROTC program at RIT. In order to be part of the NROTC program, students must successfully apply for a Navy or Marines scholarship, then earn acceptance into a college of their choice. Throughout their college careers, NROTC students take naval sciences courses, ranging from Seapower and Maritime Affairs to Leadership and Ethics. Most days start at 6 a.m. with physical training or close-order drills. The drills include physical challenges like rope climbing, pushups, pullups, and grappling, as well as running while carrying a fellow student or swimming while attached to a cinder block. Rochester also competes each year in drill and fitness competitions against other programs, hosted by Cornell and Villanova. Read the full story: www.rochester.edu/pr/Review/V82N2/0502_nrotc.html Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/C0Hky/

The Stories of Survivors

 Daniela Shapiro ’20 was three years old when she began expressing herself through art. “My dad always had his shirts dry-cleaned, and I’d draw stories on the cardboard pieces that came with them,” she says. “No words, just pictures. I’d draw about family dynamics, or a bad grade I received in school. My dad was cleaning out under his bed one day and found stacks of these stories.” Now a senior at Rochester, Shapiro is still drawing upon her feelings. But for the philosophy major from West Orange, New Jersey, the topics she explores have taken a darker, more meaningful turn. In 2017, as a first-year student at the University, Shapiro completed The Story of Survivors, a slim graphic novel that recounts the true stories of six people who lived through the Holocaust. Shapiro says writing about dark topics is a way to “process through emotions and personal history.” “It’s always been hard for me to externalize my emotions verbally,” she says. “But when you have these feelings in your head, it’s important to externalize it in some manner. Some people do it through writing, or poetry. For me, it has always been drawing.” Shapiro began The Story of Survivors as a high school senior thesis and completed it during her first year at Rochester. Attending Jewish schools from kindergarten through graduation, she had learned about the Holocaust at an early age. Survivors often came to her schools to speak, and her mother told her stories of relatives who fled Nazi oppression and who perished in concentration camps. Before arriving on the River Campus, Shapiro visited several concentration camps in Poland as part of a senior trip. “It really is like looking at a nightmare,” she says. “You walk through the gas chambers and see scratch marks on the walls. You can’t believe this actually happened.” The experience helped convince her that telling a story through images is a powerful way to reach people. In the tradition of author and illustrator Art Spiegelman, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel Maus used art to tell his family’s story of the Holocaust, Shapiro found inspiration in the lives of real people. But while Spiegelman relied on an allegorical cast of animals, Shapiro outlines the lives of young people when they were caught in the ugly net of Nazi persecution. “I wrote about people my age so my peers could relate to it,” she says. “I read Maus my senior year of high school and loved it. I’ve heard directly from countless Holocaust survivors, but none ever made me feel as connected to my cultural history as Maus.” Among those whose stories she tells were Lucille Eichengreen, who was held at four concentration camps before being liberated in 1945; Shapiro’s great-grandmother, Rose Markus, who was 15 when she fled Europe for the United States with her aunt and uncle, never to see her parents again; and Bill Lowenberg, whose mother, father, and sister were killed at Auschwitz. At 18, he weighed 84 pounds when he was liberated by American troops in 1945. He moved to the United States, enlisted in the US Army during the Korean War, and started a successful real estate company in San Francisco. He was a cofounder of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. “I tried to find details in the survivors’ stories that were relatable, like not having your own bed or a pillow to sleep on,” Shapiro says. “[Lowenberg] had to sleep in a bed with five strangers. He woke up one day and one of them was dead.” The drawings are black and white-“it just felt intuitive to do it that way,” she says-but many pages accentuate traumatic symbols such as blood or the Nazi swastika in red. Shapiro decided to study philosophy at Rochester after taking a course her first year. “I’d never been exposed to that way of thinking and explaining,” she says. “I learned how to articulate arguments soundly. Philosophy influences my art because it affects the way I perceive and process emotions, events, and facts.” Joshua Dubler, an assistant professor in the Department of Religion and Classics, describes Shapiro as “an undisciplined thinker, in the best sense of the term.” “She is uncompelled by authority and willing to follow her thoughts where they take her,” he says. Shapiro plans to continue creating graphic novels and pursue a career in graphic design after graduation. The Story of Survivors will always be special, and not because of the publicity it generated. As she writes at the end of the book: “Rejecting the Holocaust as a reality is unfair to those who perished-and those who survived. That is why I hold the torch. And so do you. Absolutely never forget.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

The Stories of Survivors

 2 aylar önce

 Daniela Shapiro ’20 was three years old when she began expressing herself through art. “My dad always had his shirts dry-cleaned, and I’d draw stories on the cardboard pieces that came with them,” she says. “No words, just pictures. I’d draw about family dynamics, or a bad grade I received in school. My dad was cleaning out under his bed one day and found stacks of these stories.” Now a senior at Rochester, Shapiro is still drawing upon her feelings. But for the philosophy major from West Orange, New Jersey, the topics she explores have taken a darker, more meaningful turn. In 2017, as a first-year student at the University, Shapiro completed The Story of Survivors, a slim graphic novel that recounts the true stories of six people who lived through the Holocaust. Shapiro says writing about dark topics is a way to “process through emotions and personal history.” “It’s always been hard for me to externalize my emotions verbally,” she says. “But when you have these feelings in your head, it’s important to externalize it in some manner. Some people do it through writing, or poetry. For me, it has always been drawing.” Shapiro began The Story of Survivors as a high school senior thesis and completed it during her first year at Rochester. Attending Jewish schools from kindergarten through graduation, she had learned about the Holocaust at an early age. Survivors often came to her schools to speak, and her mother told her stories of relatives who fled Nazi oppression and who perished in concentration camps. Before arriving on the River Campus, Shapiro visited several concentration camps in Poland as part of a senior trip. “It really is like looking at a nightmare,” she says. “You walk through the gas chambers and see scratch marks on the walls. You can’t believe this actually happened.” The experience helped convince her that telling a story through images is a powerful way to reach people. In the tradition of author and illustrator Art Spiegelman, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel Maus used art to tell his family’s story of the Holocaust, Shapiro found inspiration in the lives of real people. But while Spiegelman relied on an allegorical cast of animals, Shapiro outlines the lives of young people when they were caught in the ugly net of Nazi persecution. “I wrote about people my age so my peers could relate to it,” she says. “I read Maus my senior year of high school and loved it. I’ve heard directly from countless Holocaust survivors, but none ever made me feel as connected to my cultural history as Maus.” Among those whose stories she tells were Lucille Eichengreen, who was held at four concentration camps before being liberated in 1945; Shapiro’s great-grandmother, Rose Markus, who was 15 when she fled Europe for the United States with her aunt and uncle, never to see her parents again; and Bill Lowenberg, whose mother, father, and sister were killed at Auschwitz. At 18, he weighed 84 pounds when he was liberated by American troops in 1945. He moved to the United States, enlisted in the US Army during the Korean War, and started a successful real estate company in San Francisco. He was a cofounder of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. “I tried to find details in the survivors’ stories that were relatable, like not having your own bed or a pillow to sleep on,” Shapiro says. “[Lowenberg] had to sleep in a bed with five strangers. He woke up one day and one of them was dead.” The drawings are black and white-“it just felt intuitive to do it that way,” she says-but many pages accentuate traumatic symbols such as blood or the Nazi swastika in red. Shapiro decided to study philosophy at Rochester after taking a course her first year. “I’d never been exposed to that way of thinking and explaining,” she says. “I learned how to articulate arguments soundly. Philosophy influences my art because it affects the way I perceive and process emotions, events, and facts.” Joshua Dubler, an assistant professor in the Department of Religion and Classics, describes Shapiro as “an undisciplined thinker, in the best sense of the term.” “She is uncompelled by authority and willing to follow her thoughts where they take her,” he says. Shapiro plans to continue creating graphic novels and pursue a career in graphic design after graduation. The Story of Survivors will always be special, and not because of the publicity it generated. As she writes at the end of the book: “Rejecting the Holocaust as a reality is unfair to those who perished-and those who survived. That is why I hold the torch. And so do you. Absolutely never forget.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Eddie Glaude Jr.: Highlights from the 2020 MLK Address

 To millions, Martin Luther King, Jr. is frozen in time-a civil rights leader assassinated in 1968 at age 39. But Princeton University professor Eddie Glaude, Jr. believes many remember only King’s inspirational moments and forget his final, somber years. “There’s this view of Dr. King leading the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955, or his ‘I Have a Dream’ speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963,” says Glaude, who delivered the University of Rochester’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Address on January 24 at Strong Auditorium. “But we have to grapple with his later despair and disillusionment. In 1968, King was five years sadder and trying desperately to get the country to live up to its promise. He was trying to change the consciousness of America,. But nobody heard it, nobody cared.” Glaude is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Princeton, and chair of the department of African American studies. He has written for the New York Times and Time magazine and has been a guest on MSNBC and NBC’s Meet the Press. Glaude says “death rewrites the earlier moments of King’s life.” By the time of his murder, he says, King was disillusioned by the country’s direction, and the black power militancy exhibited by youths whose dreams of social equality had been dashed. “The fact that he said on April 3, the day before he was murdered, ‘We have some difficult days ahead, and I may not get there with you.’’’ Glaude says. “He understood there were dark times in front of us before we could reach the promised land. He dedicated his life for the promise that America would live up to its stated commitments. When viewed from the lens of today, we still have a long way to go.” Prior to his speech, Glaude met with University student leaders at Douglass Leadership House. He stressed that, while King is critical to the civil rights movement, those students-and millions of others-can fill that void. “We long for a Dr. King or an Abe Lincoln, because we don’t see our own capabilities as being sufficient,” Glaude told the students. “History converged in a way that called Dr. King forward, and he answered the call. That can happen with anybody. We don’t need another Martin Luther King. We need every day ordinary people. We are the leaders we’ve been looking for.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZzcx/

Eddie Glaude Jr.: Highlights from the 2020 MLK Address

 Aylar önce

 To millions, Martin Luther King, Jr. is frozen in time-a civil rights leader assassinated in 1968 at age 39. But Princeton University professor Eddie Glaude, Jr. believes many remember only King’s inspirational moments and forget his final, somber years. “There’s this view of Dr. King leading the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955, or his ‘I Have a Dream’ speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963,” says Glaude, who delivered the University of Rochester’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Address on January 24 at Strong Auditorium. “But we have to grapple with his later despair and disillusionment. In 1968, King was five years sadder and trying desperately to get the country to live up to its promise. He was trying to change the consciousness of America,. But nobody heard it, nobody cared.” Glaude is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Princeton, and chair of the department of African American studies. He has written for the New York Times and Time magazine and has been a guest on MSNBC and NBC’s Meet the Press. Glaude says “death rewrites the earlier moments of King’s life.” By the time of his murder, he says, King was disillusioned by the country’s direction, and the black power militancy exhibited by youths whose dreams of social equality had been dashed. “The fact that he said on April 3, the day before he was murdered, ‘We have some difficult days ahead, and I may not get there with you.’’’ Glaude says. “He understood there were dark times in front of us before we could reach the promised land. He dedicated his life for the promise that America would live up to its stated commitments. When viewed from the lens of today, we still have a long way to go.” Prior to his speech, Glaude met with University student leaders at Douglass Leadership House. He stressed that, while King is critical to the civil rights movement, those students-and millions of others-can fill that void. “We long for a Dr. King or an Abe Lincoln, because we don’t see our own capabilities as being sufficient,” Glaude told the students. “History converged in a way that called Dr. King forward, and he answered the call. That can happen with anybody. We don’t need another Martin Luther King. We need every day ordinary people. We are the leaders we’ve been looking for.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZzcx/

The Rochester Effect

 Rochester is a way of thinking. Pushing and questioning, learning and unlearning. In the relentless quest to improve humankind. Learn more at everbetter.rochester.edu. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZtUW/

The Rochester Effect

 Aylar önce

 Rochester is a way of thinking. Pushing and questioning, learning and unlearning. In the relentless quest to improve humankind. Learn more at everbetter.rochester.edu. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZtUW/

Soaking up the sun with laser treated metal

 The University of Rochester research lab that recently used lasers to create unsinkable metallic structures has now demonstrated how the same technology could be used to create highly efficient solar power generators. In a paper in Light: Science & Applications, the lab of Chunlei Guo, a professor of optics also affiliated with Physics and the Materials Science Program, describes using powerful femtosecond laser pulses to etch metal surfaces with nanoscale structures that selectively absorb light only at the solar wavelengths but not elsewhere. A regular metal surface is shiny and highly reflective. Years ago, the Guo lab developed a black metal technology that turned shiny metals pitch black. "But to make a perfect solar absorber," Guo says, "we need more than a black metal, and the result is this selective absorber." This surface not only enhances the energy absorption from sunlight but also reduces heat dissipation at other wavelengths, in effect, "making a perfect metallic solar absorber for the first time," Guo says. "We also demonstrate solar energy harnessing with a thermal electric generating device." "This will be useful for any thermal solar energy absorber or harvesting device," particularly in places with abundant sunlight, he adds. The work is funded by awards from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Army Research Office, and the National Science Foundation. The researchers experimented with aluminum, copper, steel, and tungsten, and found that tungsten, commonly used as a thermal solar absorber, had the highest solar absorption efficiency when treated with the new nanoscale structures. This improved the efficiency of thermal electrical generation by 130 percent compared to untreated tungsten. Co-authors include Sohail Jalil, Bo Lai, Mohamed Elkabbash, Jihua Zhang, Erik M. Garcell, and Subhash Singh of the Guo lab. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Soaking up the sun with laser treated metal

 2 aylar önce

 The University of Rochester research lab that recently used lasers to create unsinkable metallic structures has now demonstrated how the same technology could be used to create highly efficient solar power generators. In a paper in Light: Science & Applications, the lab of Chunlei Guo, a professor of optics also affiliated with Physics and the Materials Science Program, describes using powerful femtosecond laser pulses to etch metal surfaces with nanoscale structures that selectively absorb light only at the solar wavelengths but not elsewhere. A regular metal surface is shiny and highly reflective. Years ago, the Guo lab developed a black metal technology that turned shiny metals pitch black. "But to make a perfect solar absorber," Guo says, "we need more than a black metal, and the result is this selective absorber." This surface not only enhances the energy absorption from sunlight but also reduces heat dissipation at other wavelengths, in effect, "making a perfect metallic solar absorber for the first time," Guo says. "We also demonstrate solar energy harnessing with a thermal electric generating device." "This will be useful for any thermal solar energy absorber or harvesting device," particularly in places with abundant sunlight, he adds. The work is funded by awards from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Army Research Office, and the National Science Foundation. The researchers experimented with aluminum, copper, steel, and tungsten, and found that tungsten, commonly used as a thermal solar absorber, had the highest solar absorption efficiency when treated with the new nanoscale structures. This improved the efficiency of thermal electrical generation by 130 percent compared to untreated tungsten. Co-authors include Sohail Jalil, Bo Lai, Mohamed Elkabbash, Jihua Zhang, Erik M. Garcell, and Subhash Singh of the Guo lab. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Visiting Artist Meredith Monk

 In creating art, sometimes it's the connections that aren't immediately intuitive that make the biggest difference. When Anaar Desai-Stephens, assistant professor of ethnomusicology at the Eastman School of Music, was thinking about who she might invite for Eastman's Glenn Watkins lecture, there was one name that was at the top of her list. When she contacted Missy Pfohl Smith, director of the program of dance and movement, and director of the Institute for Performing Arts (IPA), about her idea to bring Meredith Monk to campus, the timing could hardly be more perfect. "Meredith was on a short list of people that we were interested in for our inaugural visiting artist," says Pfohl Smith about the new initiative within the Institute for Performing Arts. While music and dance go hand in hand, collaborations between Eastman and IPA are sometimes challenging due to student schedules and being located on two different campuses. This seemed like the perfect opportunity to bridge that gap. Meredith Monk is an artist whose work spans decades and many genres, making it difficult to define, but connects to fields as diverse and music composition, vocal performance, dance, film. For an artist who defies those typical categories, the collaboration between Eastman and IPA was a good fit. It exposed music students to elements of dance and movement that are less a part of their curriculum, and it taught dancers how to incorporate music, vocalization and the associated rhythm into their practice. Most importantly, it offered students an opportunity to work with and hear from a successful artist of particular distinction, and to learn that there is not one pathway to success, but that it's more of a journey. While Monk's visit opened new doors for musicians at Eastman, it might be an even clearer embodiment of the mission for the Institute for Performing Arts. "I think it's really unusual to have an artist who has such a draw for students in music from Eastman, from the River Campus, but also students who are interested in theater and performance of all kinds," adds Pfohl Smith. "That's what the Institute for Performing Arts would like to do is bring people together so that they can collaborate-so that they can learn from one another, and so that they can be inspired to keep making their own work." Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZpYX/

Visiting Artist Meredith Monk

 2 aylar önce

 In creating art, sometimes it's the connections that aren't immediately intuitive that make the biggest difference. When Anaar Desai-Stephens, assistant professor of ethnomusicology at the Eastman School of Music, was thinking about who she might invite for Eastman's Glenn Watkins lecture, there was one name that was at the top of her list. When she contacted Missy Pfohl Smith, director of the program of dance and movement, and director of the Institute for Performing Arts (IPA), about her idea to bring Meredith Monk to campus, the timing could hardly be more perfect. "Meredith was on a short list of people that we were interested in for our inaugural visiting artist," says Pfohl Smith about the new initiative within the Institute for Performing Arts. While music and dance go hand in hand, collaborations between Eastman and IPA are sometimes challenging due to student schedules and being located on two different campuses. This seemed like the perfect opportunity to bridge that gap. Meredith Monk is an artist whose work spans decades and many genres, making it difficult to define, but connects to fields as diverse and music composition, vocal performance, dance, film. For an artist who defies those typical categories, the collaboration between Eastman and IPA was a good fit. It exposed music students to elements of dance and movement that are less a part of their curriculum, and it taught dancers how to incorporate music, vocalization and the associated rhythm into their practice. Most importantly, it offered students an opportunity to work with and hear from a successful artist of particular distinction, and to learn that there is not one pathway to success, but that it's more of a journey. While Monk's visit opened new doors for musicians at Eastman, it might be an even clearer embodiment of the mission for the Institute for Performing Arts. "I think it's really unusual to have an artist who has such a draw for students in music from Eastman, from the River Campus, but also students who are interested in theater and performance of all kinds," adds Pfohl Smith. "That's what the Institute for Performing Arts would like to do is bring people together so that they can collaborate-so that they can learn from one another, and so that they can be inspired to keep making their own work." Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZpYX/

Quoting MLK: Reflecting on the Words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 Members of the University of Rochester community lend their voices to the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., reflecting the power of his message more than fifty years after his death. Readers in order of appearance: Yarnetta Leonard '22 Mercedes Ramírez Fernández Vice President for Equity and Inclusion Jamal Holtz '20 Students' Association President Thomas Crews Academic Program Coordinator, Office of Minority Student Affairs Reanna Salvador '21 Karen Chance Mercurius Associate Vice President for Alumni and Constituent Relations Kenneth Bryant '20 Frederick Jefferson Professor Emeritus, Counseling and Human Development University Intercessor Eleanor Oi Director of Diversity Programming, Office of Faculty Development and Diversity Dawn Marshall-Hosier Auxiliary Operations, Douglass Dining Executive Vice President, SEIU Local 200United Kit Miller Director, M. K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence Sarah C. Mangelsdorf University President Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZixA/

Quoting MLK: Reflecting on the Words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 2 aylar önce

 Members of the University of Rochester community lend their voices to the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., reflecting the power of his message more than fifty years after his death. Readers in order of appearance: Yarnetta Leonard '22 Mercedes Ramírez Fernández Vice President for Equity and Inclusion Jamal Holtz '20 Students' Association President Thomas Crews Academic Program Coordinator, Office of Minority Student Affairs Reanna Salvador '21 Karen Chance Mercurius Associate Vice President for Alumni and Constituent Relations Kenneth Bryant '20 Frederick Jefferson Professor Emeritus, Counseling and Human Development University Intercessor Eleanor Oi Director of Diversity Programming, Office of Faculty Development and Diversity Dawn Marshall-Hosier Auxiliary Operations, Douglass Dining Executive Vice President, SEIU Local 200United Kit Miller Director, M. K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence Sarah C. Mangelsdorf University President Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZixA/

2019: The Year in Video

 From welcoming the University's eleventh president to campus, to visits by a former secretary of state and a Nobel laureate, a lot happened at the University of Rochester in 2019. We trained our cameras on the most advanced scientific research, highest levels of achievement in the arts and humanities, and the best in medical treatment available anywhere. We told the stories of those pursuing "ever better" in their daily work, and we look forward to the next chapter in the year ahead. View the featured stories: tr-me.com/vwatch-PLQqibrU3vslpqYNlUIiGunCS59olfKy2l Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZ4Lw/

2019: The Year in Video

 3 aylar önce

 From welcoming the University's eleventh president to campus, to visits by a former secretary of state and a Nobel laureate, a lot happened at the University of Rochester in 2019. We trained our cameras on the most advanced scientific research, highest levels of achievement in the arts and humanities, and the best in medical treatment available anywhere. We told the stories of those pursuing "ever better" in their daily work, and we look forward to the next chapter in the year ahead. View the featured stories: tr-me.com/vwatch-PLQqibrU3vslpqYNlUIiGunCS59olfKy2l Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZ4Lw/

Giving the Ultimate Gift

 For more than two years, Lieutenant Dan Schermerhorn Jr. underwent dialysis for eight hours, each night while he slept, to treat his kidney disease, IgA nephropathy. An officer with the University’s Department of Public Safety (DPS) for 24 years, Schermerhorn had dealt with this disease for 15 years, until doctors at UR Medicine’s Strong Memorial Hospital told him he needed a new kidney to save his life. “Replacing a damaged kidney like mine with a new one is like putting new batteries into your flashlight when it’s starting to die, and then you’re back to fully functioning again,” says Schermerhorn. “There’s no more fatigue or dialysis.” A successful transplant returns Schermerhorn to the activities he’s passionate about, but that were restricted by his illness-running, swimming, competing in triathlons, traveling, and spending quality time with his family. Schermerhorn’s search for a new kidney began in 2016 when he was placed on the kidney transplant waiting list, and he also joined the National Kidney Registry, a non-profit network that aims to match thousands of individuals in need with a compatible, willing donor. Compatibility doesn’t come easily; Schermerhorn’s father tried to be a donor to his son, but after being evaluated for a match, found he was not compatible. In October 2017, Lieutenant Keri Stein sent an email to the entire Department of Public Safety (about 140 staff members), explaining Schermerhorn’s condition and the living donor process. Several colleagues responded by making appointments to be evaluated as possible matches. Peace Officer Paul Wlosinski remembers seeing the email from Stein. “I always have in my mind, ‘never go through life saying you could have done something,’” Wlosinski says. Wlosinski is an officer in the first platoon who over the years has worked directly with Schermerhorn on the force. Currently, he works overnight shifts, and Schermerhorn works days as part of new officer training and compliance certification programs. Wlosinski made an appointment to be evaluated as a match, and through the subsequent lab results and examinations learned that he could be a compatible and healthy kidney donor to Schermerhorn. In the months that followed, two separate teams of physicians, transplant coordinators, social workers, and others from the Division of Solid Organ Transplant at the University of Rochester Medical Center-one team solely overseeing the care for Schermerhorn, and one caring only for Wlosinski-determined that everything was looking good to move forward with a transplant. “I always have in my mind ‘never go through life saying you could have done something.’” “For me, it’s a second chance,” says Schermerhorn. “We’re like a band of brothers working here, and there’s a responsibility for him to watch my back, and I watch his. You just build that relationship. That’s how I feel now-it’s like he’s my backup. There’s a lot of things in my life that he’s impacting by doing this, and I’m very grateful for it.” “I’m just glad that I’m able to do something," says Wlosinski, who is also a US Army veteran. "I knew I had to get tested because I can. The donation of my kidney isn’t going to affect me in such great a fashion that I can’t. So, I can and I should.” “Paul’s heart amazes me in its compassion and conviction, the things that drive him to do things such as donating a kidney,” says Laura Wlosinski, Paul’s wife and an emergency dispatcher for DPS. “When we first discussed Paul getting tested, it was in great depth about what that meant for him personally and for our family going forward. He has been committed from the start and knew that if he was a match he would go through with the donation. He said to me before the initial test, ‘I don’t want to know that I potentially could have helped Dan and never tried. I can’t live with that.’ I think that accurately speaks volumes to who he is and is a great example of the way he lives.” On October 30, 2018, the Medical Center’s transplant team, led by Jeremy C. Taylor, associate director of transplant nephrology, and surgeons Mark S. Orloff and Koji Tomiyama successfully performed the transplant procedure. “After 36 years in law enforcement, I am always amazed how willing brother and sister officers are to sacrifice for each other,” says Public Safety Chief Mark Fischer. “Paul’s actions have touched my entire department, and will forever impact the life of Dan and his family. It’s truly inspirational.” Paul returned to work about a month after the surgery, Dan about six weeks later. More than a year after the transplant, both are doing well. While it was their work that bonded them initially, now they have a bigger reason for their friendship. It's a connection that is bound to last a lifetime, and for Dan, that's a much longer outlook than he ever imagined. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZ4Lx/

Giving the Ultimate Gift

 3 aylar önce

 For more than two years, Lieutenant Dan Schermerhorn Jr. underwent dialysis for eight hours, each night while he slept, to treat his kidney disease, IgA nephropathy. An officer with the University’s Department of Public Safety (DPS) for 24 years, Schermerhorn had dealt with this disease for 15 years, until doctors at UR Medicine’s Strong Memorial Hospital told him he needed a new kidney to save his life. “Replacing a damaged kidney like mine with a new one is like putting new batteries into your flashlight when it’s starting to die, and then you’re back to fully functioning again,” says Schermerhorn. “There’s no more fatigue or dialysis.” A successful transplant returns Schermerhorn to the activities he’s passionate about, but that were restricted by his illness-running, swimming, competing in triathlons, traveling, and spending quality time with his family. Schermerhorn’s search for a new kidney began in 2016 when he was placed on the kidney transplant waiting list, and he also joined the National Kidney Registry, a non-profit network that aims to match thousands of individuals in need with a compatible, willing donor. Compatibility doesn’t come easily; Schermerhorn’s father tried to be a donor to his son, but after being evaluated for a match, found he was not compatible. In October 2017, Lieutenant Keri Stein sent an email to the entire Department of Public Safety (about 140 staff members), explaining Schermerhorn’s condition and the living donor process. Several colleagues responded by making appointments to be evaluated as possible matches. Peace Officer Paul Wlosinski remembers seeing the email from Stein. “I always have in my mind, ‘never go through life saying you could have done something,’” Wlosinski says. Wlosinski is an officer in the first platoon who over the years has worked directly with Schermerhorn on the force. Currently, he works overnight shifts, and Schermerhorn works days as part of new officer training and compliance certification programs. Wlosinski made an appointment to be evaluated as a match, and through the subsequent lab results and examinations learned that he could be a compatible and healthy kidney donor to Schermerhorn. In the months that followed, two separate teams of physicians, transplant coordinators, social workers, and others from the Division of Solid Organ Transplant at the University of Rochester Medical Center-one team solely overseeing the care for Schermerhorn, and one caring only for Wlosinski-determined that everything was looking good to move forward with a transplant. “I always have in my mind ‘never go through life saying you could have done something.’” “For me, it’s a second chance,” says Schermerhorn. “We’re like a band of brothers working here, and there’s a responsibility for him to watch my back, and I watch his. You just build that relationship. That’s how I feel now-it’s like he’s my backup. There’s a lot of things in my life that he’s impacting by doing this, and I’m very grateful for it.” “I’m just glad that I’m able to do something," says Wlosinski, who is also a US Army veteran. "I knew I had to get tested because I can. The donation of my kidney isn’t going to affect me in such great a fashion that I can’t. So, I can and I should.” “Paul’s heart amazes me in its compassion and conviction, the things that drive him to do things such as donating a kidney,” says Laura Wlosinski, Paul’s wife and an emergency dispatcher for DPS. “When we first discussed Paul getting tested, it was in great depth about what that meant for him personally and for our family going forward. He has been committed from the start and knew that if he was a match he would go through with the donation. He said to me before the initial test, ‘I don’t want to know that I potentially could have helped Dan and never tried. I can’t live with that.’ I think that accurately speaks volumes to who he is and is a great example of the way he lives.” On October 30, 2018, the Medical Center’s transplant team, led by Jeremy C. Taylor, associate director of transplant nephrology, and surgeons Mark S. Orloff and Koji Tomiyama successfully performed the transplant procedure. “After 36 years in law enforcement, I am always amazed how willing brother and sister officers are to sacrifice for each other,” says Public Safety Chief Mark Fischer. “Paul’s actions have touched my entire department, and will forever impact the life of Dan and his family. It’s truly inspirational.” Paul returned to work about a month after the surgery, Dan about six weeks later. More than a year after the transplant, both are doing well. While it was their work that bonded them initially, now they have a bigger reason for their friendship. It's a connection that is bound to last a lifetime, and for Dan, that's a much longer outlook than he ever imagined. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZ4Lx/

Why are some genes selfish?

 We like to think of a healthy organism as a smoothly running machine. A whole made up of intricately related parts. Right down to the cellular level-and inside each cell itself-every element with its role, every function contributing to the good of the whole. But in fact, if you look deeply enough into living cells, you’re likely to find a whole lot of chaos. That chaos is something Rochester biologist Jack Werren observed firsthand in the 1980s. While studying entomology at the Walter Reed Institute of Research, he and a colleague discovered a bacteria that altered the sex ratios of insects by killing a large portion of the male offspring, leaving mostly females. “There is a whole class of inherited elements that alter the reproduction of insects in ways that are beneficial only to the element itself, mostly by altering sex ratios,” says Werren, the Nathaniel & Helen Wisch Professor of Biology. In 1988, Werren and his Rochester colleagues Uzi Nur and Chung-I Wu brought the diverse discoveries together, formally defining DNA parasites and junk DNA as “selfish genetic elements” (SGEs), an umbrella term for elements that share a common feature: they seek only to enhance their transmission to the next generation and are either harmful or neutral to an organism. Today Werren is one of a group of researchers in the University’s biology department studying SGEs and their impact on evolution. “The University of Rochester has one of the highest concentrations of researchers working on selfish genetic elements in North America, if not the world,” says Arvid Agren, the Wenner-Gren fellow in the department of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard University. “For many years members of the department have shaped the field, and they continue to do so.” Rochester biologists have been instrumental, for example, in discovering just how significant the elements really are. Organisms from corn to fruit flies to humans are littered with them, affecting a myriad of biological processes including speciation, aging, diseases, gene regulation, and even sex itself. “Something very dramatic has shifted,” says Daven Presgraves, a Dean’s Professor in the Department of Biology at Rochester, who studies the role of SGEs in speciation. SGEs “aren’t just these one offs that you can find here and there. Selfish genetic elements are everywhere. And they’re affecting every generation, all the time.” Each of the cells in your body share the same sequences of DNA, collectively called your genome. Each of the genes that make up the DNA, however, are coded to activate different sequences of proteins, giving cells various functions It turns out, however, that a good portion of your DNA is not even “yours.” That is, it doesn’t code for anything that makes you, you. Gregor Mendel’s laws of inheritance dictate that a set of parents should produce offspring at a ratio of 50 percent male and 50 percent female. One way to infer the presence of SGEs is to observe generations of an organism and see if their sex ratios are highly distorted: Does a set of parents have a lot more male offspring than females and vice versa? This question can be difficult to answer in organisms like humans that do not produce many offspring. “You can think off the top of your head of families that have five or more girls and that can happen randomly,” says Amanda Larracuente, an assistant professor of biology at Rochester, who studies Y chromosomes and blocks of repetitive DNA called satellite DNA. On the other hand, “if you have a family pedigree that for generations had individuals that consistently produced only female offspring, one possibility is that there is a driver on the X chromosome that kills Y-bearing sperm,” she adds. This phenomenon is well-studied in some fruit fly species. SGE research is also being applied to synthetic drive systems that could be used to suppress pest populations. Wolbachia, for example, spreads through insect populations by altering reproduction, but it also suppresses some viruses. If a mosquito carries certain strains of Wolbachia, it won’t transmit dengue fever and malaria. Injecting mosquitoes in specific regions with Wolbachia and allowing it to spread through a population can therefore help reduce the spread of disease from mosquitoes to humans. By better understanding the different types of SGEs, the ways SGEs spread, and how they give rise to steps in evolution, synthetic biologists are better able to weigh the risks and benefits of creating engineered systems. But, while SGEs are now almost universally accepted as drivers of evolution, there is still more work to be done. “We’re really only beginning to dig in to understand selfish genetic elements as a phenomenon,” Presgraves says. “We now assume that at any point in transmission, there’s a selfish genetic element looking for a way to exploit the transmission. That’s how pervasive selfish genetic elements are.”

Why are some genes selfish?

 7 aylar önce

 We like to think of a healthy organism as a smoothly running machine. A whole made up of intricately related parts. Right down to the cellular level-and inside each cell itself-every element with its role, every function contributing to the good of the whole. But in fact, if you look deeply enough into living cells, you’re likely to find a whole lot of chaos. That chaos is something Rochester biologist Jack Werren observed firsthand in the 1980s. While studying entomology at the Walter Reed Institute of Research, he and a colleague discovered a bacteria that altered the sex ratios of insects by killing a large portion of the male offspring, leaving mostly females. “There is a whole class of inherited elements that alter the reproduction of insects in ways that are beneficial only to the element itself, mostly by altering sex ratios,” says Werren, the Nathaniel & Helen Wisch Professor of Biology. In 1988, Werren and his Rochester colleagues Uzi Nur and Chung-I Wu brought the diverse discoveries together, formally defining DNA parasites and junk DNA as “selfish genetic elements” (SGEs), an umbrella term for elements that share a common feature: they seek only to enhance their transmission to the next generation and are either harmful or neutral to an organism. Today Werren is one of a group of researchers in the University’s biology department studying SGEs and their impact on evolution. “The University of Rochester has one of the highest concentrations of researchers working on selfish genetic elements in North America, if not the world,” says Arvid Agren, the Wenner-Gren fellow in the department of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard University. “For many years members of the department have shaped the field, and they continue to do so.” Rochester biologists have been instrumental, for example, in discovering just how significant the elements really are. Organisms from corn to fruit flies to humans are littered with them, affecting a myriad of biological processes including speciation, aging, diseases, gene regulation, and even sex itself. “Something very dramatic has shifted,” says Daven Presgraves, a Dean’s Professor in the Department of Biology at Rochester, who studies the role of SGEs in speciation. SGEs “aren’t just these one offs that you can find here and there. Selfish genetic elements are everywhere. And they’re affecting every generation, all the time.” Each of the cells in your body share the same sequences of DNA, collectively called your genome. Each of the genes that make up the DNA, however, are coded to activate different sequences of proteins, giving cells various functions It turns out, however, that a good portion of your DNA is not even “yours.” That is, it doesn’t code for anything that makes you, you. Gregor Mendel’s laws of inheritance dictate that a set of parents should produce offspring at a ratio of 50 percent male and 50 percent female. One way to infer the presence of SGEs is to observe generations of an organism and see if their sex ratios are highly distorted: Does a set of parents have a lot more male offspring than females and vice versa? This question can be difficult to answer in organisms like humans that do not produce many offspring. “You can think off the top of your head of families that have five or more girls and that can happen randomly,” says Amanda Larracuente, an assistant professor of biology at Rochester, who studies Y chromosomes and blocks of repetitive DNA called satellite DNA. On the other hand, “if you have a family pedigree that for generations had individuals that consistently produced only female offspring, one possibility is that there is a driver on the X chromosome that kills Y-bearing sperm,” she adds. This phenomenon is well-studied in some fruit fly species. SGE research is also being applied to synthetic drive systems that could be used to suppress pest populations. Wolbachia, for example, spreads through insect populations by altering reproduction, but it also suppresses some viruses. If a mosquito carries certain strains of Wolbachia, it won’t transmit dengue fever and malaria. Injecting mosquitoes in specific regions with Wolbachia and allowing it to spread through a population can therefore help reduce the spread of disease from mosquitoes to humans. By better understanding the different types of SGEs, the ways SGEs spread, and how they give rise to steps in evolution, synthetic biologists are better able to weigh the risks and benefits of creating engineered systems. But, while SGEs are now almost universally accepted as drivers of evolution, there is still more work to be done. “We’re really only beginning to dig in to understand selfish genetic elements as a phenomenon,” Presgraves says. “We now assume that at any point in transmission, there’s a selfish genetic element looking for a way to exploit the transmission. That’s how pervasive selfish genetic elements are.”

A Message from Dean Hall: Difficult Conversations as a Catalyst for Change

 Dean Donald Hall discusses his "Difficult Conversations as a Catalyst for Change" speaker series and announces the next guest speaker will be Georgetown professor and author Michael Eric Dyson. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZUN0/

A Message from Dean Hall: Difficult Conversations as a Catalyst for Change

 4 aylar önce

 Dean Donald Hall discusses his "Difficult Conversations as a Catalyst for Change" speaker series and announces the next guest speaker will be Georgetown professor and author Michael Eric Dyson. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/CZUN0/

Unsinkable Metal

 University of Rochester researchers, inspired by diving bell spiders and rafts of fire ants, have created a metallic structure that is so water repellant, it refuses to sink -- no matter how often it is punctured. Could this lead to: • An unsinkable ship? • A wearable flotation device that will still float after being punctured? • Electronic monitoring devices that can survive long term in the ocean? All of the above, says Chunlei Guo, professor of optics and physics, whose lab describes the structure in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. The structure uses a groundbreaking technique the lab developed for using femtosecond bursts of lasers to "etch" the surfaces of metals with intricate micro- and nanoscale patterns that trap air and make the surfaces super-hydrophobic (water repellent). The researchers found, however, that after being immersed in water for long periods of time, the surfaces may start to lose their hydrophobic properties. Enter the spiders and fire ants, which can survive long periods under or on the surface of water. How? By trapping air in an enclosed area. Argyroneta aquatic spiders, for example, create an underwater dome-shaped web - a so-called diving bell - that they fill with air carried from the surface between their super-hydrophobic legs and abdomens. Similarly, fire ants can form a raft by trapping air among their superhydrophobic bodies. "That was a very interesting inspiration," Guo says. As the researchers note in the paper: "The key insight is that multifaceted superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces can trap a large air volume, which points towards the possibility of using SH surfaces to create buoyant devices." Guo's lab created a structure in which the treated surfaces on two parallel aluminum plates face inward, not outward, so they are enclosed and free from external wear and abrasion. The surfaces are separated by just the right distance to trap and hold enough air to keep the structure floating- in essence creating a waterproof compartment. Even after being forced to submerge for two months, the structures immediately bounced back to the surface after the load was released, Guo says. In addition, because air remains trapped in remaining parts of the compartment or adjoining structures, the structures retained this ability even after being punctured multiple times. Though the team used aluminum for this project, the etching process "could be used for literally any metals, or other materials," Guo says. When the Guo lab first demonstrated the etching technique, it took an hour to pattern a one-inch-by-one-inch area of surface. Now, by using lasers seven times as powerful, and faster scanning, the lab has speeded up the process, making it more feasible for scaling up for commercial applications. Coauthors include lead author Zhibing Zhan, Mohamed ElKabbash, Jihua Zhang, and Subhash Singh, all PhD candidates or postdoctoral fellows in Guo's lab, and Jinluo Cheng, associate professor at the Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics, and Physics in China. The project was supported by funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the US Army Research Office, and National Science Foundation. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Unsinkable Metal

 5 aylar önce

 University of Rochester researchers, inspired by diving bell spiders and rafts of fire ants, have created a metallic structure that is so water repellant, it refuses to sink -- no matter how often it is punctured. Could this lead to: • An unsinkable ship? • A wearable flotation device that will still float after being punctured? • Electronic monitoring devices that can survive long term in the ocean? All of the above, says Chunlei Guo, professor of optics and physics, whose lab describes the structure in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. The structure uses a groundbreaking technique the lab developed for using femtosecond bursts of lasers to "etch" the surfaces of metals with intricate micro- and nanoscale patterns that trap air and make the surfaces super-hydrophobic (water repellent). The researchers found, however, that after being immersed in water for long periods of time, the surfaces may start to lose their hydrophobic properties. Enter the spiders and fire ants, which can survive long periods under or on the surface of water. How? By trapping air in an enclosed area. Argyroneta aquatic spiders, for example, create an underwater dome-shaped web - a so-called diving bell - that they fill with air carried from the surface between their super-hydrophobic legs and abdomens. Similarly, fire ants can form a raft by trapping air among their superhydrophobic bodies. "That was a very interesting inspiration," Guo says. As the researchers note in the paper: "The key insight is that multifaceted superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces can trap a large air volume, which points towards the possibility of using SH surfaces to create buoyant devices." Guo's lab created a structure in which the treated surfaces on two parallel aluminum plates face inward, not outward, so they are enclosed and free from external wear and abrasion. The surfaces are separated by just the right distance to trap and hold enough air to keep the structure floating- in essence creating a waterproof compartment. Even after being forced to submerge for two months, the structures immediately bounced back to the surface after the load was released, Guo says. In addition, because air remains trapped in remaining parts of the compartment or adjoining structures, the structures retained this ability even after being punctured multiple times. Though the team used aluminum for this project, the etching process "could be used for literally any metals, or other materials," Guo says. When the Guo lab first demonstrated the etching technique, it took an hour to pattern a one-inch-by-one-inch area of surface. Now, by using lasers seven times as powerful, and faster scanning, the lab has speeded up the process, making it more feasible for scaling up for commercial applications. Coauthors include lead author Zhibing Zhan, Mohamed ElKabbash, Jihua Zhang, and Subhash Singh, all PhD candidates or postdoctoral fellows in Guo's lab, and Jinluo Cheng, associate professor at the Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics, and Physics in China. The project was supported by funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the US Army Research Office, and National Science Foundation. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Engineering a Better Pumpkin Launcher

 Just before Halloween each year, students take part in a contest that combines design ingenuity with a bit of festive fun. The annual pumpkin launch competition is organized by the University of Rochester chapter of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Five teams competed this year, designing and building the launching devices. The designs are split between two different types: an air cannon and a trebuchet. In this competition, accuracy is paramount, and each of these designs has its trade-offs. Targets were set up at various distances, so while the ability to reach the farther targets is a factor in design, getting the pumpkin closer to the target is actually the key to scoring more points. After all five teams finished their attempts at each of the targets, the points were tallied. For the second year in a row, the team from chemical engineering took the top prize. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Engineering a Better Pumpkin Launcher

 5 aylar önce

 Just before Halloween each year, students take part in a contest that combines design ingenuity with a bit of festive fun. The annual pumpkin launch competition is organized by the University of Rochester chapter of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Five teams competed this year, designing and building the launching devices. The designs are split between two different types: an air cannon and a trebuchet. In this competition, accuracy is paramount, and each of these designs has its trade-offs. Targets were set up at various distances, so while the ability to reach the farther targets is a factor in design, getting the pumpkin closer to the target is actually the key to scoring more points. After all five teams finished their attempts at each of the targets, the points were tallied. For the second year in a row, the team from chemical engineering took the top prize. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

The Inauguration of Sarah C. Mangelsdorf: Full Ceremony

 The complete inauguration ceremony for the University's eleventh president, Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, held on October 4th, 2019 at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. In her message to faculty, staff, students, and members of the Rochester community, she spoke about the importance of universities in modern life, and the gravity of her role in continuing the path set by her predecessors. She also spoke about the need for inclusion and openness to people from all backgrounds, and the need for the University to engage and support not just the local community, but communities across the globe where students and faculty are working and studying. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BcRmu/

The Inauguration of Sarah C. Mangelsdorf: Full Ceremony

 5 aylar önce

 The complete inauguration ceremony for the University's eleventh president, Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, held on October 4th, 2019 at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. In her message to faculty, staff, students, and members of the Rochester community, she spoke about the importance of universities in modern life, and the gravity of her role in continuing the path set by her predecessors. She also spoke about the need for inclusion and openness to people from all backgrounds, and the need for the University to engage and support not just the local community, but communities across the globe where students and faculty are working and studying. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BcRmu/

2019 Goergen Teaching Award Winners

 The Goergen Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching was established in 1997 by University trustee and Board Chair Emeritus Robert Goergen ’60 and his wife, Pamela. The award recognizes distinctive teaching accomplishments of faculty in Arts, Sciences & Engineering. The recipients of the 2019 award are: Matthew BaileyShea, an associate professor in the College’s Department of Music and the Eastman School of Music Ryan Prendergast, an associate professor of Spanish in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures Katherine Schaefer, an associate professor of instruction in the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program “Out of a particularly strong crop of nominations, we selected three excellent educators: congratulations to professors BaileyShea, Prendergast, and Schaefer,” says Jeffrey Runner, dean of the College. “I am so grateful to Bob and Pam Goergen for enabling us to recognize this critical aspect of our faculty’s role in the university. So many students have been positively impacted by their hard work and ingenious ways of making the material they’re teaching come alive.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2019 Goergen Teaching Award Winners

 5 aylar önce

 The Goergen Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching was established in 1997 by University trustee and Board Chair Emeritus Robert Goergen ’60 and his wife, Pamela. The award recognizes distinctive teaching accomplishments of faculty in Arts, Sciences & Engineering. The recipients of the 2019 award are: Matthew BaileyShea, an associate professor in the College’s Department of Music and the Eastman School of Music Ryan Prendergast, an associate professor of Spanish in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures Katherine Schaefer, an associate professor of instruction in the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program “Out of a particularly strong crop of nominations, we selected three excellent educators: congratulations to professors BaileyShea, Prendergast, and Schaefer,” says Jeffrey Runner, dean of the College. “I am so grateful to Bob and Pam Goergen for enabling us to recognize this critical aspect of our faculty’s role in the university. So many students have been positively impacted by their hard work and ingenious ways of making the material they’re teaching come alive.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

The Inauguration of Sarah C. Mangelsdorf: Ceremony Highlights

 Highlights from the inauguration ceremony for the University's eleventh president, Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, held on October 4th, 2019 at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. In her message to faculty, staff, students, and members of the Rochester community, she spoke about the importance of universities in modern life, and the gravity of her role in continuing the path set by her predecessors. She also spoke about the need for inclusion and openness to people from all backgrounds, and the need for the University to engage and support not just the local community, but communities across the globe where students and faculty are working and studying. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

The Inauguration of Sarah C. Mangelsdorf: Ceremony Highlights

 6 aylar önce

 Highlights from the inauguration ceremony for the University's eleventh president, Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, held on October 4th, 2019 at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. In her message to faculty, staff, students, and members of the Rochester community, she spoke about the importance of universities in modern life, and the gravity of her role in continuing the path set by her predecessors. She also spoke about the need for inclusion and openness to people from all backgrounds, and the need for the University to engage and support not just the local community, but communities across the globe where students and faculty are working and studying. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

The Inauguration of Sarah C. Mangelsdorf: Presidential Address Highlight

 An excerpt from the remarks by President Sarah C. Mangelsdorf at her inauguration held on October 4th, 2019 at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

The Inauguration of Sarah C. Mangelsdorf: Presidential Address Highlight

 6 aylar önce

 An excerpt from the remarks by President Sarah C. Mangelsdorf at her inauguration held on October 4th, 2019 at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

A Message from Dean Hall: Arts, Sciences & Engineering Priorities

 Dean Donald Hall discusses the new strategic priorities for Arts, Sciences & Engineering. To learn more, visit www.rochester.edu/ase/priorities Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BKupM/

A Message from Dean Hall: Arts, Sciences & Engineering Priorities

 6 aylar önce

 Dean Donald Hall discusses the new strategic priorities for Arts, Sciences & Engineering. To learn more, visit www.rochester.edu/ase/priorities Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BKupM/

University of Rochester in Arezzo, Italy

 The Lisio Italian Studies Program in Arezzo, Italy is the University of Rochester faculty-led semester abroad program. 2019 alumni invite students from the university to consider study in Italy next semester. For more information, please visit www.sas.rochester.edu/mlc/arezzo Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BJDse/

University of Rochester in Arezzo, Italy

 6 aylar önce

 The Lisio Italian Studies Program in Arezzo, Italy is the University of Rochester faculty-led semester abroad program. 2019 alumni invite students from the university to consider study in Italy next semester. For more information, please visit www.sas.rochester.edu/mlc/arezzo Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BJDse/

The Beatles' Abbey Road, 50 Years Later

 It was February of 1969, and coming off possibly the lowest point in their careers during the Get Back/Let It Be recording sessions, The Beatles wanted to give it one more shot. One last recording session, one last album. But how does such an iconic and storied band finally bring the train back to the station? The Beatles' answer: Abbey Road. From the now famous cover art, the opening baseline of “Come Together,” the extensive side two medley and the final notes of “The End” (followed by Paul's little ditty “Her Majesty,” because they could never end on too serious of a note), it was their swan song. Released on September 26, 1969, it would not be the final album they released (the aforementioned Let It Be came out in 1970), but it was the final album they recorded together, and the final notes they played together as a band. After the release, they would each go on to their solo careers, and leave The Beatles in the rearview mirror. So five decades later, what place does Abbey Road hold in their catalog? John Covach, director of the University of Rochester Institute for Popular Music, sees it as a nice blend of their pop sensibilities, and a more refined example of their experimental and artistic side than had appeared on previous albums. While it may not have lived up to everyone's expectations at the time of its release, 50 years later it stands as a fitting end to one of the greatest rock and roll collaborations of all time. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

The Beatles' Abbey Road, 50 Years Later

 6 aylar önce

 It was February of 1969, and coming off possibly the lowest point in their careers during the Get Back/Let It Be recording sessions, The Beatles wanted to give it one more shot. One last recording session, one last album. But how does such an iconic and storied band finally bring the train back to the station? The Beatles' answer: Abbey Road. From the now famous cover art, the opening baseline of “Come Together,” the extensive side two medley and the final notes of “The End” (followed by Paul's little ditty “Her Majesty,” because they could never end on too serious of a note), it was their swan song. Released on September 26, 1969, it would not be the final album they released (the aforementioned Let It Be came out in 1970), but it was the final album they recorded together, and the final notes they played together as a band. After the release, they would each go on to their solo careers, and leave The Beatles in the rearview mirror. So five decades later, what place does Abbey Road hold in their catalog? John Covach, director of the University of Rochester Institute for Popular Music, sees it as a nice blend of their pop sensibilities, and a more refined example of their experimental and artistic side than had appeared on previous albums. While it may not have lived up to everyone's expectations at the time of its release, 50 years later it stands as a fitting end to one of the greatest rock and roll collaborations of all time. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Pursuing Their Passions: Class of 2023

 Meet a handful of members from our very eclectic and accomplished Class of 2023. This year's class includes 1,396 students from 44 states and 65 countries and were selected from a record 21,300 applicants. The Eastman School of Music welcomed 130 first-year students from 35 states and eight countries. James Bantayou comes to Rochester from Boca Raton, Florida after being recruited to play football. After the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, just miles from his home, he was inspired to get involved in local government and study political science, seeking solutions for gun violence. Sanaa Finley is a self-taught drummer from Ocean, New Jersey. She says she started playing when her mother bought her a drum kit at age five, and learned everything she knows by ear and later in marching band. Her interest in technology led her to combine those two passions and study audio and music engineering, and that Rochester provided just the right balance to pursue both. Fernanda Sesto attended a high school in her native Uruguay that specialized in computer science, one of only three female students in the school. She came to Rochester to continue that path and wants to inspire other women to pursue technology fields. She also wants to continue her outreach to communities that lack technology, as she had done before college by starting a non-profit that teaches computer science to children from low-income families. Jafrè Chase comes to the Eastman School of Music to continue his studies in viola, a passion he has pursued since fourth grade. He previously studied at the Baltimore School of the Arts, and decided to forego opportunities to study at conservatories closer to his hometown and come to Rochester. After enduring financial hardships in his family, where they even found themselves homeless for nearly a year, Jafrè points the supportive community at Eastman as being a key factor in that decision. He says they teach not just how to play at high level, but how to take care of your whole self. Siera Sadowski traveled to Rochester from Texas, but thinks of nearby Buffalo as her hometown, despite many moves during her childhood as her father sought work as an independent contractor. She says that it has always been her dream to attend college, and the Handler scholarship, which provides full tuition to students with significant financial need, made it possible for her to be the first in her family to do so. During a gap year following high school, she taught English in Ecuador, where she was inspired to enroll as a GRADE Scholar, a five year program at the University allowing students to get both a bachelor's degree and then a master's at the Warner School of Education. She hopes to use that knowledge to work on reforming troubled schools. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/tmHC/

Pursuing Their Passions: Class of 2023

 6 aylar önce

 Meet a handful of members from our very eclectic and accomplished Class of 2023. This year's class includes 1,396 students from 44 states and 65 countries and were selected from a record 21,300 applicants. The Eastman School of Music welcomed 130 first-year students from 35 states and eight countries. James Bantayou comes to Rochester from Boca Raton, Florida after being recruited to play football. After the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, just miles from his home, he was inspired to get involved in local government and study political science, seeking solutions for gun violence. Sanaa Finley is a self-taught drummer from Ocean, New Jersey. She says she started playing when her mother bought her a drum kit at age five, and learned everything she knows by ear and later in marching band. Her interest in technology led her to combine those two passions and study audio and music engineering, and that Rochester provided just the right balance to pursue both. Fernanda Sesto attended a high school in her native Uruguay that specialized in computer science, one of only three female students in the school. She came to Rochester to continue that path and wants to inspire other women to pursue technology fields. She also wants to continue her outreach to communities that lack technology, as she had done before college by starting a non-profit that teaches computer science to children from low-income families. Jafrè Chase comes to the Eastman School of Music to continue his studies in viola, a passion he has pursued since fourth grade. He previously studied at the Baltimore School of the Arts, and decided to forego opportunities to study at conservatories closer to his hometown and come to Rochester. After enduring financial hardships in his family, where they even found themselves homeless for nearly a year, Jafrè points the supportive community at Eastman as being a key factor in that decision. He says they teach not just how to play at high level, but how to take care of your whole self. Siera Sadowski traveled to Rochester from Texas, but thinks of nearby Buffalo as her hometown, despite many moves during her childhood as her father sought work as an independent contractor. She says that it has always been her dream to attend college, and the Handler scholarship, which provides full tuition to students with significant financial need, made it possible for her to be the first in her family to do so. During a gap year following high school, she taught English in Ecuador, where she was inspired to enroll as a GRADE Scholar, a five year program at the University allowing students to get both a bachelor's degree and then a master's at the Warner School of Education. She hopes to use that knowledge to work on reforming troubled schools. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/tmHC/

Finding Your Voice at Eastman

 What is it like to be a student at Eastman? Hear from undergraduate voice majors Julia Fedor '19 and Travon Walker '21 as they talk about their own path through Eastman’s rigorous curriculum. From the personal connection they develop with their professors, to the varied coursework that helps them to become a more well-rounded performer, and the opportunity to expand beyond the core curriculum to explore broader interests, there are a whole host of reasons why Eastman is a top choice of so many students pursuing a career in music. From the studio to the stage, see how Eastman might be the right place to continue your educational journey. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/rID0/

Finding Your Voice at Eastman

 7 aylar önce

 What is it like to be a student at Eastman? Hear from undergraduate voice majors Julia Fedor '19 and Travon Walker '21 as they talk about their own path through Eastman’s rigorous curriculum. From the personal connection they develop with their professors, to the varied coursework that helps them to become a more well-rounded performer, and the opportunity to expand beyond the core curriculum to explore broader interests, there are a whole host of reasons why Eastman is a top choice of so many students pursuing a career in music. From the studio to the stage, see how Eastman might be the right place to continue your educational journey. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/rID0/

Becoming Rooted to Rochester on Wilson Day

 Nearly 1,400 first-year College students fanned out across the City of Rochester on Monday for the 31st annual Wilson Day. They visited 87 sites-daycare centers, museums, churches, schools, senior centers, and more-and performed tasks such as pulling weeds, painting, and organizing classrooms. The day of community service is the longest running tradition organized by the Rochester Center for Community Leadership for first-year and transfer students, and part of their orientation. On Monday, they were joined by University president Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, who addressed them at the Goergen Athletic Center before visiting the M.K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, the Cameron Community Ministries, and the Southeast Quadrant Neighborhood Service Center. Mangelsdorf urged “the importance of engaging with the Rochester community” as part of each student’s college experience and as part of the University’s mission. “Wilson Day has benefited our community in many ways,” she said. “It has enriched the lives of countless University students, and it has served as a touchstone for the University’s engagement with the surrounding community, setting the stage for future growth and institutional transformation.” Wilson Day is named in honor of Joseph Wilson ’31, a former chair of the University’s Board of Trustees, the founder of the Xerox Corp., and a noted philanthropist who gave generously to community organizations throughout the Greater Rochester region, including more than $40 million to the University. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qwzA/

Becoming Rooted to Rochester on Wilson Day

 7 aylar önce

 Nearly 1,400 first-year College students fanned out across the City of Rochester on Monday for the 31st annual Wilson Day. They visited 87 sites-daycare centers, museums, churches, schools, senior centers, and more-and performed tasks such as pulling weeds, painting, and organizing classrooms. The day of community service is the longest running tradition organized by the Rochester Center for Community Leadership for first-year and transfer students, and part of their orientation. On Monday, they were joined by University president Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, who addressed them at the Goergen Athletic Center before visiting the M.K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, the Cameron Community Ministries, and the Southeast Quadrant Neighborhood Service Center. Mangelsdorf urged “the importance of engaging with the Rochester community” as part of each student’s college experience and as part of the University’s mission. “Wilson Day has benefited our community in many ways,” she said. “It has enriched the lives of countless University students, and it has served as a touchstone for the University’s engagement with the surrounding community, setting the stage for future growth and institutional transformation.” Wilson Day is named in honor of Joseph Wilson ’31, a former chair of the University’s Board of Trustees, the founder of the Xerox Corp., and a noted philanthropist who gave generously to community organizations throughout the Greater Rochester region, including more than $40 million to the University. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qwzA/

Move-in Day for the Class of 2023

 Paul Yoon ’23 lived in Texas before moving with his family to South Korea to attend high school. Wednesday, he set up a new address nearly 7,000 miles from home: the University of Rochester. “I’m definitely nervous, but it’s a good nervous,” said the environmental sciences major, a violist who plans to audition for the University’s symphony orchestra. “I’m excited to be here.” Yoon is one of 1,396 students in the College’s incoming Class of 2023. They come from 44 states and 65 countries and were selected from a record 21,300 applicants. More than 300 international students moved in Monday. The Eastman School of Music welcomed 130 first-year students from 35 states and eight countries. As incoming students and their families lined their vehicles up in Park Lot on Wednesday morning, they were serenaded by College a cappella groups. University President Sarah C. Mangelsdorf and her husband, Karl Rosengren, a professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, greeted students and their families at residence halls on the River Campus. The couple, who began their roles July 1, helped student volunteers unload packed vehicles in front of the Susan B. Anthony Halls. “She seems like a nice, lovely person,” said Anna Job, a microbiology major from Germantown, Maryland. “I look forward to getting to know her.” After settling in, students in the College and at the Eastman School of Music will engage in orientation activities leading up to the first day of classes on Wednesday, August 28. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qraj/

Move-in Day for the Class of 2023

 7 aylar önce

 Paul Yoon ’23 lived in Texas before moving with his family to South Korea to attend high school. Wednesday, he set up a new address nearly 7,000 miles from home: the University of Rochester. “I’m definitely nervous, but it’s a good nervous,” said the environmental sciences major, a violist who plans to audition for the University’s symphony orchestra. “I’m excited to be here.” Yoon is one of 1,396 students in the College’s incoming Class of 2023. They come from 44 states and 65 countries and were selected from a record 21,300 applicants. More than 300 international students moved in Monday. The Eastman School of Music welcomed 130 first-year students from 35 states and eight countries. As incoming students and their families lined their vehicles up in Park Lot on Wednesday morning, they were serenaded by College a cappella groups. University President Sarah C. Mangelsdorf and her husband, Karl Rosengren, a professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, greeted students and their families at residence halls on the River Campus. The couple, who began their roles July 1, helped student volunteers unload packed vehicles in front of the Susan B. Anthony Halls. “She seems like a nice, lovely person,” said Anna Job, a microbiology major from Germantown, Maryland. “I look forward to getting to know her.” After settling in, students in the College and at the Eastman School of Music will engage in orientation activities leading up to the first day of classes on Wednesday, August 28. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qraj/

Donning the White Coat

 More than 100 medical students formally became members of the University of Rochester’s School of Medicine & Dentistry on Friday during the annual Robert L. & Lillian H. Brent White Coat Ceremony at the Interfaith Chapel. The 104 students received their white coats-the traditional lab jackets worn by physicians and medical scientists-to symbolize they are joining their peers and predecessors in the profession. “In receiving your white coats today, our newest medical students accept the responsibilities of compassion and confidential patient care, both in their words and in their actions,” said Mark Taubman, dean of the School of Medicine & Dentistry. Rochester has held the ceremony each year since 1994. It’s named in honor of Robert Brent ’48, ’53M (MD), ’55M (PhD) and Lillian Brent ’50, longtime benefactors to the school. The Class of 2023 was chosen from approximately 5,800 applications. Their average age is 24, all are citizens or permanent residents of the United States, and 17 were born in countries such as China, Korea, Canada, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, and the Ukraine. They hail from 25 states, led by New York (36), Massachusetts (10), and California and New Jersey (8 each). They attended 54 different colleges and universities as undergraduates, including 20 who were students at the University of Rochester. Other schools represented include Cornell, Duke, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Notre Dame, Princeton, and UCLA. Edgar Alaniz-Cantu ’17 graduated from the University with bachelor degrees in biology and clinical psychology. The resident of McAllen, Texas, applied to 20 medical schools but ultimately chose Rochester for one simple reason: “I didn’t want to leave.” He plans to specialize in primary care, with a focus on the Latino population. “It’s an exciting day, and a privilege to wear this coat,” he said. “I look forward to many years of service.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qj9h/

Donning the White Coat

 7 aylar önce

 More than 100 medical students formally became members of the University of Rochester’s School of Medicine & Dentistry on Friday during the annual Robert L. & Lillian H. Brent White Coat Ceremony at the Interfaith Chapel. The 104 students received their white coats-the traditional lab jackets worn by physicians and medical scientists-to symbolize they are joining their peers and predecessors in the profession. “In receiving your white coats today, our newest medical students accept the responsibilities of compassion and confidential patient care, both in their words and in their actions,” said Mark Taubman, dean of the School of Medicine & Dentistry. Rochester has held the ceremony each year since 1994. It’s named in honor of Robert Brent ’48, ’53M (MD), ’55M (PhD) and Lillian Brent ’50, longtime benefactors to the school. The Class of 2023 was chosen from approximately 5,800 applications. Their average age is 24, all are citizens or permanent residents of the United States, and 17 were born in countries such as China, Korea, Canada, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, and the Ukraine. They hail from 25 states, led by New York (36), Massachusetts (10), and California and New Jersey (8 each). They attended 54 different colleges and universities as undergraduates, including 20 who were students at the University of Rochester. Other schools represented include Cornell, Duke, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Notre Dame, Princeton, and UCLA. Edgar Alaniz-Cantu ’17 graduated from the University with bachelor degrees in biology and clinical psychology. The resident of McAllen, Texas, applied to 20 medical schools but ultimately chose Rochester for one simple reason: “I didn’t want to leave.” He plans to specialize in primary care, with a focus on the Latino population. “It’s an exciting day, and a privilege to wear this coat,” he said. “I look forward to many years of service.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qj9h/

A Message from Dean Donald Hall: Welcome Back!

 Dean Donald Hall welcomes the AS&E community to the University of Rochester's Fall 2019 semester. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qj5U/

A Message from Dean Donald Hall: Welcome Back!

 7 aylar önce

 Dean Donald Hall welcomes the AS&E community to the University of Rochester's Fall 2019 semester. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qj5U/

Go Abroad 2019

 Challenge yourself to live, learn, explore, network, research. Go abroad! We'll see you at the Global Fair on Wednesday, September 18, 2019 from 1-4pm in the Feldman Ballroom, Douglass Commons. Find out more here: rochester.edu/college/abroad/news/global-fair.html Credits: Animation by Emma Hsieh ('15E), EYCH Studio Music by Shoghi Hayes ('15E) Sound by Billy Petito ('17E) Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qfmX/

Go Abroad 2019

 7 aylar önce

 Challenge yourself to live, learn, explore, network, research. Go abroad! We'll see you at the Global Fair on Wednesday, September 18, 2019 from 1-4pm in the Feldman Ballroom, Douglass Commons. Find out more here: rochester.edu/college/abroad/news/global-fair.html Credits: Animation by Emma Hsieh ('15E), EYCH Studio Music by Shoghi Hayes ('15E) Sound by Billy Petito ('17E) Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/qfmX/

President Mangelsdorf Takes in Tasty Tuesdays

 Sarah Mangelsdorf spent her lunch break on her second day as president taking in a University tradition: Tasty Tuesdays. Each summer, a selection of food trucks roll onto Wilson Quad to serve up a selection of delicious options. With her sights set on meeting with as many people around the University community as she can these first few months on the job, what better way than to go where the food is? Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/pmFB/

President Mangelsdorf Takes in Tasty Tuesdays

 9 aylar önce

 Sarah Mangelsdorf spent her lunch break on her second day as president taking in a University tradition: Tasty Tuesdays. Each summer, a selection of food trucks roll onto Wilson Quad to serve up a selection of delicious options. With her sights set on meeting with as many people around the University community as she can these first few months on the job, what better way than to go where the food is? Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/pmFB/

How can understanding motion perception improve vision?

 Visual motion is an important source of information for separating objects from their backgrounds. A spider camouflaged against a branch, for instance, immediately loses its invisibility once it starts moving. A friend you’re trying to spot in a crowded airport terminal is more distinguishable once she begins waving her hands. According to new research from scientists at the University of Rochester, one reason human beings are good at discerning smaller moving objects in the foreground is that the brain becomes desensitized to larger background stimuli. Conversely, when a person’s brain is more sensitive to background motion, the negative trade-off is that she will be less sensitive to smaller foreground objects. The research, published in the journal Nature Communications, could lead to new training programs for elderly adults and patients with conditions such as schizophrenia and depression, which have been linked to weaker motion segregation. “The human brain cannot possibly process all of the information around us,” says Duje Tadin, a professor of brain and cognitive sciences at Rochester and the lead author of the study. “Being less sensitive to things that are less important makes the brain more efficient and faster at accomplishing the more important tasks.” Take driving, for instance. As the background scenery whizzes by, it is imperative that a driver see and avoid cars, pedestrians, and other objects on the road. There are two basic ways the brain can distinguish such objects from moving backgrounds. It can enhance the objects that matter; or, it can suppress the background, and, by virtue of this suppression, enhance the objects. The latter is “the more efficient option,” Tadin says. “Think about trying to have a conversation in a room with high background noise. It is more effective to find a way to turn off the noise than it is to just try speaking more loudly.” In order to test people’s ability to identify moving objects on a moving background, the researchers showed study participants moving textured patterns. Within the textured background, there was a smaller patterned object moving in the direction opposite from the background. The participants were instructed to report either the location or the shape of the smaller patterned object. The researchers found that younger adults were better at seeing smaller moving objects in the foreground, and worse at seeing background motion. Older adults-participants aged 65 and above-were the opposite. They were poorer at seeing the smaller moving objects because they had a heightened awareness of the backdrop against which the objects moved. Younger adults took on average 20 milliseconds to pick out the moving objects, and older adults took about 30 milliseconds. While both groups were efficient at the task, taking only a fraction of a second to detect the movement of the object against the background, “those extra milliseconds could make a big difference,” says Woon Ju Park, a former postdoctoral associate in Tadin’s lab and currently a research associate at the University of Washington. A split second could mean the difference between hitting or avoiding a pedestrian; or be just enough time to lose sight of a rambunctious child. In the case of the animal world, it could mean the difference between life and death. In evolutionary terms, being able to quickly detect motion is critical for a species’ survival. “If you think of an animal in the woods, if there is a moving object, that could either be lunch for the animal or something that could eat that animal for lunch,” Park says. “Animals are really good at camouflage, but even the best camouflage pulls apart with motion.” Although the research shows that the ability to detect moving objects against a moving background decreases with age, the research also offers some good news for older adults. The researchers found that older adults could train their brains to process motion more like younger adults by practicing visual segmentation of moving objects. Older participants performed the study task for four weeks, with four sessions per week, and became quicker at the task, narrowing the gap in performance with their younger counterparts. Surprisingly, the researchers found, the older participants who underwent training did not, in fact, get better at seeing the smaller moving object; their ability to see the target was just as good as it was at the beginning of the training. What changed with training was that the older adults became less sensitive to the background motion, just like younger adults. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTEP/

How can understanding motion perception improve vision?

 9 aylar önce

 Visual motion is an important source of information for separating objects from their backgrounds. A spider camouflaged against a branch, for instance, immediately loses its invisibility once it starts moving. A friend you’re trying to spot in a crowded airport terminal is more distinguishable once she begins waving her hands. According to new research from scientists at the University of Rochester, one reason human beings are good at discerning smaller moving objects in the foreground is that the brain becomes desensitized to larger background stimuli. Conversely, when a person’s brain is more sensitive to background motion, the negative trade-off is that she will be less sensitive to smaller foreground objects. The research, published in the journal Nature Communications, could lead to new training programs for elderly adults and patients with conditions such as schizophrenia and depression, which have been linked to weaker motion segregation. “The human brain cannot possibly process all of the information around us,” says Duje Tadin, a professor of brain and cognitive sciences at Rochester and the lead author of the study. “Being less sensitive to things that are less important makes the brain more efficient and faster at accomplishing the more important tasks.” Take driving, for instance. As the background scenery whizzes by, it is imperative that a driver see and avoid cars, pedestrians, and other objects on the road. There are two basic ways the brain can distinguish such objects from moving backgrounds. It can enhance the objects that matter; or, it can suppress the background, and, by virtue of this suppression, enhance the objects. The latter is “the more efficient option,” Tadin says. “Think about trying to have a conversation in a room with high background noise. It is more effective to find a way to turn off the noise than it is to just try speaking more loudly.” In order to test people’s ability to identify moving objects on a moving background, the researchers showed study participants moving textured patterns. Within the textured background, there was a smaller patterned object moving in the direction opposite from the background. The participants were instructed to report either the location or the shape of the smaller patterned object. The researchers found that younger adults were better at seeing smaller moving objects in the foreground, and worse at seeing background motion. Older adults-participants aged 65 and above-were the opposite. They were poorer at seeing the smaller moving objects because they had a heightened awareness of the backdrop against which the objects moved. Younger adults took on average 20 milliseconds to pick out the moving objects, and older adults took about 30 milliseconds. While both groups were efficient at the task, taking only a fraction of a second to detect the movement of the object against the background, “those extra milliseconds could make a big difference,” says Woon Ju Park, a former postdoctoral associate in Tadin’s lab and currently a research associate at the University of Washington. A split second could mean the difference between hitting or avoiding a pedestrian; or be just enough time to lose sight of a rambunctious child. In the case of the animal world, it could mean the difference between life and death. In evolutionary terms, being able to quickly detect motion is critical for a species’ survival. “If you think of an animal in the woods, if there is a moving object, that could either be lunch for the animal or something that could eat that animal for lunch,” Park says. “Animals are really good at camouflage, but even the best camouflage pulls apart with motion.” Although the research shows that the ability to detect moving objects against a moving background decreases with age, the research also offers some good news for older adults. The researchers found that older adults could train their brains to process motion more like younger adults by practicing visual segmentation of moving objects. Older participants performed the study task for four weeks, with four sessions per week, and became quicker at the task, narrowing the gap in performance with their younger counterparts. Surprisingly, the researchers found, the older participants who underwent training did not, in fact, get better at seeing the smaller moving object; their ability to see the target was just as good as it was at the beginning of the training. What changed with training was that the older adults became less sensitive to the background motion, just like younger adults. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTEP/

Sarah Mangelsdorf's First Day on Campus

 Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, the 11th president in the University of Rochester’s history, arrived on campus for her first day on July 1st. To begin the day, she toured the River Campus with Jessica Robbins ’20, a Meridian tour guide and a psychology major, and Bruce Bashwiner, senior associate vice president for facilities. President Mangelsdorf highlighted in her remarks to the media that she would like to spend her first few months on the job traveling around the University, meeting with as many people as she can in the places where they work and study. As she put it, this listening and learning tour will be an opportunity to find out from the University community what they think should be the priorities for the future, helping to establish a collaborative spirit moving forward. In addition to meeting with members of the campus community, she also highlighted the importance of the University’s connection to the city of Rochester and the wider region, looking forward to a bright future working together. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Sarah Mangelsdorf's First Day on Campus

 9 aylar önce

 Sarah C. Mangelsdorf, the 11th president in the University of Rochester’s history, arrived on campus for her first day on July 1st. To begin the day, she toured the River Campus with Jessica Robbins ’20, a Meridian tour guide and a psychology major, and Bruce Bashwiner, senior associate vice president for facilities. President Mangelsdorf highlighted in her remarks to the media that she would like to spend her first few months on the job traveling around the University, meeting with as many people as she can in the places where they work and study. As she put it, this listening and learning tour will be an opportunity to find out from the University community what they think should be the priorities for the future, helping to establish a collaborative spirit moving forward. In addition to meeting with members of the campus community, she also highlighted the importance of the University’s connection to the city of Rochester and the wider region, looking forward to a bright future working together. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Garden Party 2019

 A conversation with President Richard Feldman and University Trustee Sandy Parker

Garden Party 2019

 9 aylar önce

 A conversation with President Richard Feldman and University Trustee Sandy Parker

2019 Commencement: Julia Bullock Eastman Commencement Address Excerpt

 Watch a longer excerpt from Julia Bullock's '09E commencement address for the Eastman School of Music. Bullock is a vocalist and interpretive artist most recently named Artist-in-Residence of San Francisco Symphony. Previously, she was Artist-in-Residence of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. She is also the opera-programming host of All Arts, and a founding core member of the American Modern Opera Company. Read a full transcript of the speech: www.esm.rochester.edu/about/2019commencement-guest/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2019 Commencement: Julia Bullock Eastman Commencement Address Excerpt

 10 aylar önce

 Watch a longer excerpt from Julia Bullock's '09E commencement address for the Eastman School of Music. Bullock is a vocalist and interpretive artist most recently named Artist-in-Residence of San Francisco Symphony. Previously, she was Artist-in-Residence of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. She is also the opera-programming host of All Arts, and a founding core member of the American Modern Opera Company. Read a full transcript of the speech: www.esm.rochester.edu/about/2019commencement-guest/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2019 Commencement: Eastman School of Music Ceremony Highlights

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the Eastman School of Music, held at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre on May 19, 2019. The speaker for the occasion was Julia Bullock '09E, vocalist and interpretive artist most recently named Artist-in-Residence of San Francisco Symphony. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2019 Commencement: Eastman School of Music Ceremony Highlights

 10 aylar önce

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the Eastman School of Music, held at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre on May 19, 2019. The speaker for the occasion was Julia Bullock '09E, vocalist and interpretive artist most recently named Artist-in-Residence of San Francisco Symphony. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2019 Commencement: Donna Strickland Full College Commencement Address

 Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) returned to the University 30 years after completing her PhD to deliver the commencement address for the College. It was that PhD work with her graduate advisor Gérard Mourou on chirped-pulse amplification of lasers that led to them being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018. Strickland spoke about when she got the call that informed her of the Nobel, and the place the University of Rochester held for her in light of that recognition. "I knew I that I had to share the moment with the University of Rochester. After all, this is where the magic happened," Strickland noted in her speech. She also spoke about how she had dreamed of getting a PhD since she was child, and despite that, almost quit at one point. Upon consideration, she realized there was nothing else she could imagine herself doing. So she completed her PhD at the University, and the research that made her only the third woman ever to receive the Nobel Prize in Physics. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oyGJ/

2019 Commencement: Donna Strickland Full College Commencement Address

 10 aylar önce

 Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) returned to the University 30 years after completing her PhD to deliver the commencement address for the College. It was that PhD work with her graduate advisor Gérard Mourou on chirped-pulse amplification of lasers that led to them being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018. Strickland spoke about when she got the call that informed her of the Nobel, and the place the University of Rochester held for her in light of that recognition. "I knew I that I had to share the moment with the University of Rochester. After all, this is where the magic happened," Strickland noted in her speech. She also spoke about how she had dreamed of getting a PhD since she was child, and despite that, almost quit at one point. Upon consideration, she realized there was nothing else she could imagine herself doing. So she completed her PhD at the University, and the research that made her only the third woman ever to receive the Nobel Prize in Physics. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oyGJ/

2019 Commencement: College Ceremony Highlights

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the College, which took place on Eastman Quadrangle on May 19, 2019. The speaker for the occasion was Donna Strickland '89 (PhD), recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics and Professor of Physics at the University of Waterloo. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page:

2019 Commencement: College Ceremony Highlights

 10 aylar önce

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the College, which took place on Eastman Quadrangle on May 19, 2019. The speaker for the occasion was Donna Strickland '89 (PhD), recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics and Professor of Physics at the University of Waterloo. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page:

2019 Commencement: Donna Strickland Speaker Highlight

 Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) returned to the University 30 years after completing her PhD to deliver the commencement address for the College of Arts, Sciences, & Engineering. It was that PhD work with her graduate advisor Gérard Mourou on chirped-pulse amplification of lasers that led to them being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018. Strickland spoke of the phone call that brought the news of her Nobel, and the place Rochester held, making it possible for her to do that groundbreaking work.

2019 Commencement: Donna Strickland Speaker Highlight

 10 aylar önce

 Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) returned to the University 30 years after completing her PhD to deliver the commencement address for the College of Arts, Sciences, & Engineering. It was that PhD work with her graduate advisor Gérard Mourou on chirped-pulse amplification of lasers that led to them being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018. Strickland spoke of the phone call that brought the news of her Nobel, and the place Rochester held, making it possible for her to do that groundbreaking work.

A View from the Top

 Twice each year, the iconic tower of Rush Rhees Library is open to students for a tour. The chance come once in the fall, around Halloween, and again during Senior Week, just before Commencement. For students who have spent several years looking up at the tower from the ground, and studying underneath it, it's an opportunity that they don't want to pass up. With just one very small and very old elevator (among the oldest in the city) taking visitors there, the lines can get a tad long at times. Once there, the upbeat mood of those viewing the city of Rochester and the River Campus below tells you about all you need to know about whether the wait was worth it. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oux7/

A View from the Top

 10 aylar önce

 Twice each year, the iconic tower of Rush Rhees Library is open to students for a tour. The chance come once in the fall, around Halloween, and again during Senior Week, just before Commencement. For students who have spent several years looking up at the tower from the ground, and studying underneath it, it's an opportunity that they don't want to pass up. With just one very small and very old elevator (among the oldest in the city) taking visitors there, the lines can get a tad long at times. Once there, the upbeat mood of those viewing the city of Rochester and the River Campus below tells you about all you need to know about whether the wait was worth it. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oux7/

Thanking Mom for Helping Us Dream Big

 When we gathered a group of students to talk about about how their scholarships helped them pursue their education, it didn't take long for the conversation to turn to the role their mothers played in that pursuit. The Alan and Jane Handler Endowed Scholars all receive a full-scholarship to attend the University, and part of the criteria for the award is their outstanding academic achievement. Many of them credit their moms for supporting them through difficult times to press on and reach their fullest potential. For several of them, growing up with a single mother, there was no other person who loomed larger in their lives. The scholarship gave them the financial means to go to college, but it also meant that their mother would not have to struggle just to help them have a better life. Mothers are frequently the first role model kids have in their lives, and the most lasting one. So, whether it's Mother's Day, graduation day, or any other day of the year, it's never a bad idea to stop and take a moment to say "thanks, Mom." Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/op1F/

Thanking Mom for Helping Us Dream Big

 11 aylar önce

 When we gathered a group of students to talk about about how their scholarships helped them pursue their education, it didn't take long for the conversation to turn to the role their mothers played in that pursuit. The Alan and Jane Handler Endowed Scholars all receive a full-scholarship to attend the University, and part of the criteria for the award is their outstanding academic achievement. Many of them credit their moms for supporting them through difficult times to press on and reach their fullest potential. For several of them, growing up with a single mother, there was no other person who loomed larger in their lives. The scholarship gave them the financial means to go to college, but it also meant that their mother would not have to struggle just to help them have a better life. Mothers are frequently the first role model kids have in their lives, and the most lasting one. So, whether it's Mother's Day, graduation day, or any other day of the year, it's never a bad idea to stop and take a moment to say "thanks, Mom." Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/op1F/

Making Their Mark: Class of 2019

 Each year in the lead up to Commencement, we take a moment to gather some members of the graduating class for some parting thoughts on their time here. This year, we selected five students from different backgrounds and courses of study to find out what brought them here, how they have grown in the last four years, and what they will take with them in the next phase of their lives. Kharimat Alatise The biomedical engineering major is a McNair Scholar from Nigeria and a first-generation student. She arrived at the University passionate about science but not sure she belonged and intimidated at the thought of approaching a professor about research opportunities. The David T. Kearns Center for Leadership and Diversity helped her overcome that shyness. She learned critical skills for networking and grad school preparation and seized upon two summer research opportunities. In the fall, she will attend graduate school at Clemson University where she will continue her studies in biomedical engineering. She is determined to be a professor herself and improve the underrepresentation of minorities among the ranks of engineering faculty. Nik Angyal The East Fishkill, NY native has a 3.99 GPA as a chemical engineering major. A standout defender for the men's soccer team, Nik is only the third Academic All-American of the Year in UR history. In 2018, he was a key member of the team that reached the NCAA Division III Final Four, the best result in program history. Nik was named an Elite 90 Award winner, given to the student-athlete with the top GPA at the Final Four. He spent the summer before junior year working for NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation, helping mitigate petroleum leaks and prevent them from reaching drinking water sources. He plans to go on to graduate school and eventually work on research into fuel technology. Hannah Dick Originally from Schenectady, Hannah is completing a dual degree in percussion performance (Eastman School of Music) and brain and cognitive sciences. She just won a prestigious Fulbright Grant to Sweden, where she will research studies in percussion performance, improvisation, and pedagogy. She was co-chair of the student advisory committee for the University presidential search. She is a member of the University's Performance and Dance Movement group, working with students from local high schools. She has been accepted into the e5 program, which allows selected students the chance to launch a project and engage in an economic of social experiential pursuit. Gillian Gingher With parents who both graduated from the University of Rochester in the class of 1984, Gillian initially wasn't sure she could make her own way here. That changed after making a visit on her own from her home on Long Island. She quickly fell in love with the place and embraced the connection her parents had here. A dual major in business and art history, she plans on pursuing a master’s degree in architecture following graduation. In addition to being a Meridian, Student Alumni Ambassador, and the events manager at the Hartnett Gallery, Gillian interned at several art museums in NYC and at the Memorial Art Gallery. Suman Kumar Growing up, Suman learned how to build things from his father, who is a welder and machinist by trade. Looking around at his home city of Kathmandu, Nepal, he could see how many problems there were with infrastructure and wanted to do something about it. He had his first business contract through the UN just out of high school and knew he wanted to study mechanical engineering to better understand the theoretical side of design and fabrication. After a devastating 2015 earthquake in his native Nepal, Suman was part of a group of UR students helping to build shelters for 26,000 people and several schools using locally sourced earthquake resistant materials. After graduation, he plans to continue his humanitarian work using his engineering skills and attend graduate school. He would eventually like to return to Nepal to get involved in policy and governmental work. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/omEt/

Making Their Mark: Class of 2019

 11 aylar önce

 Each year in the lead up to Commencement, we take a moment to gather some members of the graduating class for some parting thoughts on their time here. This year, we selected five students from different backgrounds and courses of study to find out what brought them here, how they have grown in the last four years, and what they will take with them in the next phase of their lives. Kharimat Alatise The biomedical engineering major is a McNair Scholar from Nigeria and a first-generation student. She arrived at the University passionate about science but not sure she belonged and intimidated at the thought of approaching a professor about research opportunities. The David T. Kearns Center for Leadership and Diversity helped her overcome that shyness. She learned critical skills for networking and grad school preparation and seized upon two summer research opportunities. In the fall, she will attend graduate school at Clemson University where she will continue her studies in biomedical engineering. She is determined to be a professor herself and improve the underrepresentation of minorities among the ranks of engineering faculty. Nik Angyal The East Fishkill, NY native has a 3.99 GPA as a chemical engineering major. A standout defender for the men's soccer team, Nik is only the third Academic All-American of the Year in UR history. In 2018, he was a key member of the team that reached the NCAA Division III Final Four, the best result in program history. Nik was named an Elite 90 Award winner, given to the student-athlete with the top GPA at the Final Four. He spent the summer before junior year working for NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation, helping mitigate petroleum leaks and prevent them from reaching drinking water sources. He plans to go on to graduate school and eventually work on research into fuel technology. Hannah Dick Originally from Schenectady, Hannah is completing a dual degree in percussion performance (Eastman School of Music) and brain and cognitive sciences. She just won a prestigious Fulbright Grant to Sweden, where she will research studies in percussion performance, improvisation, and pedagogy. She was co-chair of the student advisory committee for the University presidential search. She is a member of the University's Performance and Dance Movement group, working with students from local high schools. She has been accepted into the e5 program, which allows selected students the chance to launch a project and engage in an economic of social experiential pursuit. Gillian Gingher With parents who both graduated from the University of Rochester in the class of 1984, Gillian initially wasn't sure she could make her own way here. That changed after making a visit on her own from her home on Long Island. She quickly fell in love with the place and embraced the connection her parents had here. A dual major in business and art history, she plans on pursuing a master’s degree in architecture following graduation. In addition to being a Meridian, Student Alumni Ambassador, and the events manager at the Hartnett Gallery, Gillian interned at several art museums in NYC and at the Memorial Art Gallery. Suman Kumar Growing up, Suman learned how to build things from his father, who is a welder and machinist by trade. Looking around at his home city of Kathmandu, Nepal, he could see how many problems there were with infrastructure and wanted to do something about it. He had his first business contract through the UN just out of high school and knew he wanted to study mechanical engineering to better understand the theoretical side of design and fabrication. After a devastating 2015 earthquake in his native Nepal, Suman was part of a group of UR students helping to build shelters for 26,000 people and several schools using locally sourced earthquake resistant materials. After graduation, he plans to continue his humanitarian work using his engineering skills and attend graduate school. He would eventually like to return to Nepal to get involved in policy and governmental work. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/omEt/

A Message from Dean Hall: The Humanities

 Dean Hall talks about the value of the humanities and the roles they play in vocational and personal success. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/omEu/

A Message from Dean Hall: The Humanities

 11 aylar önce

 Dean Hall talks about the value of the humanities and the roles they play in vocational and personal success. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/omEu/

How has your scholarship changed your life?

 Each year, we get together scholarship recipients from across the University to ask them how the financial support they have received has helped them. This year, instead of just talking to the recipients themselves, we also invited their mentors and scholarship donors to create a conversation about what brought them here and how their scholarship made their education possible. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFC/

How has your scholarship changed your life?

 Yıl önce

 Each year, we get together scholarship recipients from across the University to ask them how the financial support they have received has helped them. This year, instead of just talking to the recipients themselves, we also invited their mentors and scholarship donors to create a conversation about what brought them here and how their scholarship made their education possible. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFC/

Seashells, Strong Bones, and Moon Houses - Creating artificial mother-of-pearl

 The strongest synthetic materials are often those that intentionally mimic nature. One natural substance scientists have looked to in creating synthetic materials is nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl. An exceptionally tough, stiff material produced by some mollusks and serving as their inner shell layer, it also comprises the outer layer of pearls, giving them their lustrous shine. But while nacre’s unique properties make it an ideal inspiration in the creation of synthetic materials, most methods used to produce artificial mother-of-pearl are complex and energy intensive. Now, a biologist at the University of Rochester has invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre using an innovative component: bacteria. The artificial nacre created by Anne S. Meyer, an associate professor of biology at Rochester, and her colleagues is made of biologically produced materials and has the toughness of natural nacre, while also being stiff and, surprisingly, bendable. The method used to create the novel material could lead to new applications in medicine, engineering-and even constructing buildings on the moon. The impressive mechanical properties of natural nacre arise from its hierarchical, layered structure, which allows energy to disperse evenly across the material. In a paper published in the journal Small, Meyer and her colleagues outline their method of using two strains of bacteria to replicate these layers. When they examined the samples under an electron microscope, the structure created by the bacteria was layered similarly to nacre produced naturally by mollusks. Although nacre-inspired materials have been created synthetically before, the methods used to make them typically involve expensive equipment, extreme temperatures, high-pressure conditions, and toxic chemicals, Meyer says. “Many people creating artificial nacre use polymer layers that are only soluble in nonaqueous solutions, an organic solvent, and then they have this giant bucket of waste at the end of the procedure that has to be disposed of.” To produce nacre in Meyer’s lab, however, all researchers have to do is grow bacteria and let it sit in a warm place. In order to make the artificial nacre, Meyer and her team create alternating thin layers of crystalized calcium carbonate-like cement-and sticky polymer. They first take a glass or plastic slide and place it in a beaker containing the bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii, a calcium source, and urea (in the human body, urea is the waste product excreted by the kidneys during urination). This combination triggers the crystallization of calcium carbonate. To make the polymer layer, they place the slide into a solution of the bacteria Bacillus licheniformis, then let the beaker sit in an incubator. Right now it takes about a day to build up a layer, approximately five micrometers thick, of calcium carbonate and polymer. Meyer and her team are currently looking at coating other materials like metal with the nacre, and “we’re trying new techniques to make thicker, nacre-like materials faster and that could be the entire material itself,” Meyer says. Building houses on the moon One of the most beneficial characteristics of the nacre produced in Meyer’s lab is that it is biocompatible-made of materials the human body produces or that humans can eat naturally anyway. This makes the nacre ideal for medical applications like artificial bones and implants, Meyer says. “If you break your arm, for example, you might put in a metal pin that has to be removed with a second surgery after your bone heals. A pin made out of our material would be stiff and tough, but you wouldn’t have to remove it.” And, while the material is tougher and stiffer than most plastics, it is very lightweight, a quality that is especially valuable for transportation vehicles like airplanes, boats, or rockets, where every extra pound means extra fuel. Because the production of bacterial nacre doesn’t require any complex instruments, and the nacre coating protects against chemical degradation and weathering, it holds promise for civil engineering applications like crack prevention, protective coatings for erosion control, or for conservation of cultural artifacts, and could be useful in the food industry, as a sustainable packaging material. The nacre might also be an ideal material to build houses on the moon and other planets: the only necessary “ingredients” would be an astronaut and a small tube of bacteria, Meyer says. “The moon has a large amount of calcium in the moon dust, so the calcium’s already there. The astronaut brings the bacteria, and the astronaut makes the urea, which is the only other thing you need to start making calcium carbonate layers.”

Seashells, Strong Bones, and Moon Houses - Creating artificial mother-of-pearl

 Yıl önce

 The strongest synthetic materials are often those that intentionally mimic nature. One natural substance scientists have looked to in creating synthetic materials is nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl. An exceptionally tough, stiff material produced by some mollusks and serving as their inner shell layer, it also comprises the outer layer of pearls, giving them their lustrous shine. But while nacre’s unique properties make it an ideal inspiration in the creation of synthetic materials, most methods used to produce artificial mother-of-pearl are complex and energy intensive. Now, a biologist at the University of Rochester has invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre using an innovative component: bacteria. The artificial nacre created by Anne S. Meyer, an associate professor of biology at Rochester, and her colleagues is made of biologically produced materials and has the toughness of natural nacre, while also being stiff and, surprisingly, bendable. The method used to create the novel material could lead to new applications in medicine, engineering-and even constructing buildings on the moon. The impressive mechanical properties of natural nacre arise from its hierarchical, layered structure, which allows energy to disperse evenly across the material. In a paper published in the journal Small, Meyer and her colleagues outline their method of using two strains of bacteria to replicate these layers. When they examined the samples under an electron microscope, the structure created by the bacteria was layered similarly to nacre produced naturally by mollusks. Although nacre-inspired materials have been created synthetically before, the methods used to make them typically involve expensive equipment, extreme temperatures, high-pressure conditions, and toxic chemicals, Meyer says. “Many people creating artificial nacre use polymer layers that are only soluble in nonaqueous solutions, an organic solvent, and then they have this giant bucket of waste at the end of the procedure that has to be disposed of.” To produce nacre in Meyer’s lab, however, all researchers have to do is grow bacteria and let it sit in a warm place. In order to make the artificial nacre, Meyer and her team create alternating thin layers of crystalized calcium carbonate-like cement-and sticky polymer. They first take a glass or plastic slide and place it in a beaker containing the bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii, a calcium source, and urea (in the human body, urea is the waste product excreted by the kidneys during urination). This combination triggers the crystallization of calcium carbonate. To make the polymer layer, they place the slide into a solution of the bacteria Bacillus licheniformis, then let the beaker sit in an incubator. Right now it takes about a day to build up a layer, approximately five micrometers thick, of calcium carbonate and polymer. Meyer and her team are currently looking at coating other materials like metal with the nacre, and “we’re trying new techniques to make thicker, nacre-like materials faster and that could be the entire material itself,” Meyer says. Building houses on the moon One of the most beneficial characteristics of the nacre produced in Meyer’s lab is that it is biocompatible-made of materials the human body produces or that humans can eat naturally anyway. This makes the nacre ideal for medical applications like artificial bones and implants, Meyer says. “If you break your arm, for example, you might put in a metal pin that has to be removed with a second surgery after your bone heals. A pin made out of our material would be stiff and tough, but you wouldn’t have to remove it.” And, while the material is tougher and stiffer than most plastics, it is very lightweight, a quality that is especially valuable for transportation vehicles like airplanes, boats, or rockets, where every extra pound means extra fuel. Because the production of bacterial nacre doesn’t require any complex instruments, and the nacre coating protects against chemical degradation and weathering, it holds promise for civil engineering applications like crack prevention, protective coatings for erosion control, or for conservation of cultural artifacts, and could be useful in the food industry, as a sustainable packaging material. The nacre might also be an ideal material to build houses on the moon and other planets: the only necessary “ingredients” would be an astronaut and a small tube of bacteria, Meyer says. “The moon has a large amount of calcium in the moon dust, so the calcium’s already there. The astronaut brings the bacteria, and the astronaut makes the urea, which is the only other thing you need to start making calcium carbonate layers.”

A Message from Dean Hall: First-Generation Students

 Dean Hall discusses how being the first in his family to attend college helps him understand the needs of first-generation students. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oWJ4/

A Message from Dean Hall: First-Generation Students

 Yıl önce

 Dean Hall discusses how being the first in his family to attend college helps him understand the needs of first-generation students. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oWJ4/

Tracing the Genetic Lineage of Beer

 The explosion of craft breweries in the last several years has opened up a world of possibilities for the discerning beer drinker, and for the brewers trying to satisfy their thirst. For many of these smaller breweries, like Three Heads Brewing in Rochester’s Neighborhood of the Arts, the ability to experiment is part of what sets them apart from larger operations. That doesn’t mean creating a consistent brand isn’t important. “Consistency is your brand building. That's how you make your bread and butter,” says Bruce Lish, Director of Brewing Operations at Three Heads. “Your bread and butter also allows you to go out and try new things and experiment and that really drives people in the door to come try out what you've got coming up next.” That drive to experiment, but also predict how the beer chemistry will turn out is part of what makes understanding the science of the brewing process so important. Justin Fay, an associate professor of biology at the University of Rochester, studies yeast in order to tackle bigger questions about evolutionary biology. For example: What is the genetic basis of evolutionary change? What is the basis of differences among species or among individuals within a species? “Whether that’s differences in temperature preferences or differences in certain domesticated brewing characteristics, we want to know what genes are involved,” Fay says. In a paper published in the journal PloS Biology, Fay and his colleagues report some intriguing findings about a specialized strain of commercial yeast called Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast. S. cerevisiae has been used to make beer for thousands of years and is genetically distinct from wild populations of yeast. But while brewer's yeast has specialized characteristics, its historical origins have been difficult to determine because yeast was around long before people discovered microorganisms. Fay and his colleagues set out to unravel the complex pedigree of brewer’s yeast by analyzing its genome. What they found was surprising: the genome of brewer’s yeast is actually derived from a combination of the yeast strains used to make European grape wine and the yeasts used to make Asian rice wine. The results provide information about the domestication of organisms and may offer brewers insights that can lead to novel, new beer flavors. Beer is made from three essential ingredients: water, yeast, and a carbohydrate such as barley. Brewer’s yeast is known for its strong fermentative characteristics that, in the presence of oxygen, allow it to convert sugars from the carbohydrate into alcohol. It has gained the ability, much like grapes, to competitively dominate other species in high-sugar, low-nutrient environments. Most beers, especially Western beers, are one of two types-ales or lagers. Cell division within the yeast-and the temperature-are essential in determining the beer’s flavor. To reconstruct the history of modern ale strains, Fay and his colleagues sequenced and compared the genomes of modern brewer’s yeast to a panel of reference strains. That’s how they discovered that the genomes of the modern beer strains were similar to the genomes of European grape wine strains and Asian rice wine strains. The researchers conjecture that modern brewer’s yeast is derived from a melting pot of fermentation technology, resulting from an East-West transfer similar to the spread of domesticated plants and animals by way of the Silk Route, thousands of years ago. While yeast has traveled the world, brewers have used different strains of S. cerevisiae in their beers. Fay’s research may open doors for even more unique brews. “Beermakers are experimental, always wanting to try new things and make their beers distinct,” he says. “Very recently-and our study will add to this-beermakers have been exploring using other yeast strains besides the typical commercial beer strains. If you really want to be creative and do something different, you could go out and use a wild strain of yeast, but you need to be able to combine the beneficial characteristics of the yeast strains that are commercially available with novel characteristics. Knowing more about where beer strains came from will help facilitate that.” For brewers like Bruce Lish, this kind of knowledge is what makes brewing beer interesting after more than 20 years in the business. “I find it fascinating first of all that people can trace strains down to specific regions of the world. The sky is the limit with your kinds of yeasts you can use and the outcomes you can expect from them. So the more the merrier” Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oTZh/

Tracing the Genetic Lineage of Beer

 Yıl önce

 The explosion of craft breweries in the last several years has opened up a world of possibilities for the discerning beer drinker, and for the brewers trying to satisfy their thirst. For many of these smaller breweries, like Three Heads Brewing in Rochester’s Neighborhood of the Arts, the ability to experiment is part of what sets them apart from larger operations. That doesn’t mean creating a consistent brand isn’t important. “Consistency is your brand building. That's how you make your bread and butter,” says Bruce Lish, Director of Brewing Operations at Three Heads. “Your bread and butter also allows you to go out and try new things and experiment and that really drives people in the door to come try out what you've got coming up next.” That drive to experiment, but also predict how the beer chemistry will turn out is part of what makes understanding the science of the brewing process so important. Justin Fay, an associate professor of biology at the University of Rochester, studies yeast in order to tackle bigger questions about evolutionary biology. For example: What is the genetic basis of evolutionary change? What is the basis of differences among species or among individuals within a species? “Whether that’s differences in temperature preferences or differences in certain domesticated brewing characteristics, we want to know what genes are involved,” Fay says. In a paper published in the journal PloS Biology, Fay and his colleagues report some intriguing findings about a specialized strain of commercial yeast called Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast. S. cerevisiae has been used to make beer for thousands of years and is genetically distinct from wild populations of yeast. But while brewer's yeast has specialized characteristics, its historical origins have been difficult to determine because yeast was around long before people discovered microorganisms. Fay and his colleagues set out to unravel the complex pedigree of brewer’s yeast by analyzing its genome. What they found was surprising: the genome of brewer’s yeast is actually derived from a combination of the yeast strains used to make European grape wine and the yeasts used to make Asian rice wine. The results provide information about the domestication of organisms and may offer brewers insights that can lead to novel, new beer flavors. Beer is made from three essential ingredients: water, yeast, and a carbohydrate such as barley. Brewer’s yeast is known for its strong fermentative characteristics that, in the presence of oxygen, allow it to convert sugars from the carbohydrate into alcohol. It has gained the ability, much like grapes, to competitively dominate other species in high-sugar, low-nutrient environments. Most beers, especially Western beers, are one of two types-ales or lagers. Cell division within the yeast-and the temperature-are essential in determining the beer’s flavor. To reconstruct the history of modern ale strains, Fay and his colleagues sequenced and compared the genomes of modern brewer’s yeast to a panel of reference strains. That’s how they discovered that the genomes of the modern beer strains were similar to the genomes of European grape wine strains and Asian rice wine strains. The researchers conjecture that modern brewer’s yeast is derived from a melting pot of fermentation technology, resulting from an East-West transfer similar to the spread of domesticated plants and animals by way of the Silk Route, thousands of years ago. While yeast has traveled the world, brewers have used different strains of S. cerevisiae in their beers. Fay’s research may open doors for even more unique brews. “Beermakers are experimental, always wanting to try new things and make their beers distinct,” he says. “Very recently-and our study will add to this-beermakers have been exploring using other yeast strains besides the typical commercial beer strains. If you really want to be creative and do something different, you could go out and use a wild strain of yeast, but you need to be able to combine the beneficial characteristics of the yeast strains that are commercially available with novel characteristics. Knowing more about where beer strains came from will help facilitate that.” For brewers like Bruce Lish, this kind of knowledge is what makes brewing beer interesting after more than 20 years in the business. “I find it fascinating first of all that people can trace strains down to specific regions of the world. The sky is the limit with your kinds of yeasts you can use and the outcomes you can expect from them. So the more the merrier” Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oTZh/

Introducing Warner School of Education Dean, Anand R. Marri

 Anand R. Marri became dean of the Warner School on January 1, 2019. He is the former vice president and head of outreach and education at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and was a professor of social studies and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. In this introduction, Dean Marri shares his background and thoughts on the strengths of and opportunities for the Warner School, with a focus on equity and excellence. More on Dean Marri… www.warner.rochester.edu/facultystaff/who/marri Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oKs2/

Introducing Warner School of Education Dean, Anand R. Marri

 Yıl önce

 Anand R. Marri became dean of the Warner School on January 1, 2019. He is the former vice president and head of outreach and education at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and was a professor of social studies and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. In this introduction, Dean Marri shares his background and thoughts on the strengths of and opportunities for the Warner School, with a focus on equity and excellence. More on Dean Marri… www.warner.rochester.edu/facultystaff/who/marri Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/oKs2/

Digitizing a Piece of History from the AIDS Epidemic

 On the occasion of the anniversary of the Stonewall riots, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation collaborated with the Digital Scholarship Lab to create a new digital reproduction of the University of Rochester’s NAMES Project’s AIDS Memorial Quilt. The 12 foot by 12 foot panel includes notes, tributes, and signatures collected in April 1994, when the national AIDS quilt was on display at University of Rochester’s Goergen Athletic Center. There were three significant challenges with this digitization project. First, the size of the panel was too large to capture in a single image. Rather, it had to be systematically imaged piece by piece, and it was difficult to keep track of orientation within the panel during that process. The second challenge was working with the material. The canvas material could be challenging to get flat, and minimize wrinkles, shadows, and warp in the images that were captured. Finally, the editing process involved stitching dozens of images together and matching up not only the writing, but the texture of the fabric. Once complete, the goal is to make the panel available online for viewers to view and interact with this piece of University history. Read more on the process of digitizing the panel: dslab.lib.rochester.edu/digitizing-on-a-big-scale-the-names-projects-aids-memorial-quilt/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Digitizing a Piece of History from the AIDS Epidemic

 Yıl önce

 On the occasion of the anniversary of the Stonewall riots, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation collaborated with the Digital Scholarship Lab to create a new digital reproduction of the University of Rochester’s NAMES Project’s AIDS Memorial Quilt. The 12 foot by 12 foot panel includes notes, tributes, and signatures collected in April 1994, when the national AIDS quilt was on display at University of Rochester’s Goergen Athletic Center. There were three significant challenges with this digitization project. First, the size of the panel was too large to capture in a single image. Rather, it had to be systematically imaged piece by piece, and it was difficult to keep track of orientation within the panel during that process. The second challenge was working with the material. The canvas material could be challenging to get flat, and minimize wrinkles, shadows, and warp in the images that were captured. Finally, the editing process involved stitching dozens of images together and matching up not only the writing, but the texture of the fabric. Once complete, the goal is to make the panel available online for viewers to view and interact with this piece of University history. Read more on the process of digitizing the panel: dslab.lib.rochester.edu/digitizing-on-a-big-scale-the-names-projects-aids-memorial-quilt/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

A Message from Dean Hall: Diversity and Inclusion

 Dean Hall offers a personal reflection on the value of diversity and inclusivity on college campuses. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/nqhp/

A Message from Dean Hall: Diversity and Inclusion

 Yıl önce

 Dean Hall offers a personal reflection on the value of diversity and inclusivity on college campuses. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/nqhp/

Symone Sanders: Highlights from the 2019 MLK Address

 On January 23, 2019, the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Address was delivered by Symone Sanders, a CNN political commentator and National Press Secretary for Senator Bernie Sanders' 2016 presidential campaign. Prior to the address, Sanders met with students at the Douglass Leadership House for a discussion on her career, activism, and politics. In her address, Sanders framed Martin Luther King Jr. as a "revolutionary radical," particularly after the passage of the 1965 voting rights act, when he became more outspoken about controversial issues like his opposition to the Vietnam War. He also began to expand his social justice causes toward the poverty that affected not just black Americans, but Americans of all races, alienating some who preferred a singular fight for racial equality. In addition to her work on CNN, Sanders is a regular contributor to the Crooked Media network of podcasts. She has been featured on NPR, Fox News, MSNBC, NBC, and BET and has been profiled in the Washington Post, the New Yorker, Essence magazine, and Elle. At 25, she was youngest press secretary for a presidential candidate in history and earned a spot on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of 16 young Americans shaping the election. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Symone Sanders: Highlights from the 2019 MLK Address

 Yıl önce

 On January 23, 2019, the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Address was delivered by Symone Sanders, a CNN political commentator and National Press Secretary for Senator Bernie Sanders' 2016 presidential campaign. Prior to the address, Sanders met with students at the Douglass Leadership House for a discussion on her career, activism, and politics. In her address, Sanders framed Martin Luther King Jr. as a "revolutionary radical," particularly after the passage of the 1965 voting rights act, when he became more outspoken about controversial issues like his opposition to the Vietnam War. He also began to expand his social justice causes toward the poverty that affected not just black Americans, but Americans of all races, alienating some who preferred a singular fight for racial equality. In addition to her work on CNN, Sanders is a regular contributor to the Crooked Media network of podcasts. She has been featured on NPR, Fox News, MSNBC, NBC, and BET and has been profiled in the Washington Post, the New Yorker, Essence magazine, and Elle. At 25, she was youngest press secretary for a presidential candidate in history and earned a spot on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of 16 young Americans shaping the election. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

A Message from Dean Hall: Educating Students to be Engaged Citizens

 Dean Hall discusses higher education's role and responsibility in creating informed and engaged citizens. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/n3tA/

A Message from Dean Hall: Educating Students to be Engaged Citizens

 Yıl önce

 Dean Hall discusses higher education's role and responsibility in creating informed and engaged citizens. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/n3tA/

One family, two generations, three degrees

 Giuliano Agostinho de Castro ’20 lives in a house a few miles from the River Campus with two fellow University of Rochester students. One is in the doctoral program at the Warner School of Education, and the other is pursuing a master’s degree in history. They study together, ride to school together, dine together, and swap family stories. The stories are often the same, because Giuliano’s housemates are also his parents. Giuliano was paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident in his native Brazil two years ago. His parents, Gilberto and Marcia, moved to Rochester to be his caretakers and decided to further their education at the University. They’re 5,000 miles from home, three students bonded by hope, love, and college. Marcia took a leave from her job as a professor of engineering at University Estacio after the accident. Gilberto had been the head of a university system in Brazil before resigning his position prior to the accident. He already had a master’s degree in industrial engineering, while Marcia has a PhD in the same field. But they craved more, for different reasons. “When I heard about the Warner School, I knew it was an opportunity to help me do better what I’ve done the last 10 years in Brazil,” Gilberto says. Marcia had been devouring literature on spinal cord injuries and needed another outlet. “I’ve always loved history,” she says. “I applied for a master’s in history, and I’m so happy. Ever since we saw this campus, I’ve been a Yellowjacket in my heart.” Giuliano and Marcia are scheduled to graduate in 2020. Gilberto, a former business executive, hopes to receive his doctorate in education in 2022. As for Giuliano, his determination to complete what he started at the U of R never wavered. With some help from several faculty members and staff, he managed to continue his studies uninterrupted from the rehab facility he went to in Chicago following the accident. The long distance coursework kept him from getting behind, and took his mind off the grueling therapy regimen, which forced him to relearn even simple tasks like eating and bathing. At first, he had no control of his torso and couldn’t sit straight up. Now, he can. “This was the one thing doctors said he’d never recover, because it was right below the level of injury,” Marcia says. “But because of physical therapy and his determination, he got it back.” “Everyone told me I’d never walk again, but I never believed them." Giuliano says. "I will walk again.” Walking beside him will be his parents. “They’re super excited about being part of my world here,” he says. “It’s their world too, now. That makes me pretty happy.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

One family, two generations, three degrees

 Yıl önce

 Giuliano Agostinho de Castro ’20 lives in a house a few miles from the River Campus with two fellow University of Rochester students. One is in the doctoral program at the Warner School of Education, and the other is pursuing a master’s degree in history. They study together, ride to school together, dine together, and swap family stories. The stories are often the same, because Giuliano’s housemates are also his parents. Giuliano was paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident in his native Brazil two years ago. His parents, Gilberto and Marcia, moved to Rochester to be his caretakers and decided to further their education at the University. They’re 5,000 miles from home, three students bonded by hope, love, and college. Marcia took a leave from her job as a professor of engineering at University Estacio after the accident. Gilberto had been the head of a university system in Brazil before resigning his position prior to the accident. He already had a master’s degree in industrial engineering, while Marcia has a PhD in the same field. But they craved more, for different reasons. “When I heard about the Warner School, I knew it was an opportunity to help me do better what I’ve done the last 10 years in Brazil,” Gilberto says. Marcia had been devouring literature on spinal cord injuries and needed another outlet. “I’ve always loved history,” she says. “I applied for a master’s in history, and I’m so happy. Ever since we saw this campus, I’ve been a Yellowjacket in my heart.” Giuliano and Marcia are scheduled to graduate in 2020. Gilberto, a former business executive, hopes to receive his doctorate in education in 2022. As for Giuliano, his determination to complete what he started at the U of R never wavered. With some help from several faculty members and staff, he managed to continue his studies uninterrupted from the rehab facility he went to in Chicago following the accident. The long distance coursework kept him from getting behind, and took his mind off the grueling therapy regimen, which forced him to relearn even simple tasks like eating and bathing. At first, he had no control of his torso and couldn’t sit straight up. Now, he can. “This was the one thing doctors said he’d never recover, because it was right below the level of injury,” Marcia says. “But because of physical therapy and his determination, he got it back.” “Everyone told me I’d never walk again, but I never believed them." Giuliano says. "I will walk again.” Walking beside him will be his parents. “They’re super excited about being part of my world here,” he says. “It’s their world too, now. That makes me pretty happy.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Soapine Trade Cards, Illustrated by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

 The University of Rochester has recently acquired a collection of personal letters from feminist reformer and author Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Though best known for writings, Gilman was also a trained artist and illustrator, and the new collection includes 15 of her uncredited illustrated trade cards. These cards served as popular advertisements after the Civil War, and the entire collection of these cards and Gilman's personal letters is now available online through the University's Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation. View the collection: digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/ur/charlotte-perkins-gilman-papers Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Soapine Trade Cards, Illustrated by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

 Yıl önce

 The University of Rochester has recently acquired a collection of personal letters from feminist reformer and author Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Though best known for writings, Gilman was also a trained artist and illustrator, and the new collection includes 15 of her uncredited illustrated trade cards. These cards served as popular advertisements after the Civil War, and the entire collection of these cards and Gilman's personal letters is now available online through the University's Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation. View the collection: digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/ur/charlotte-perkins-gilman-papers Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Art and Observation: Improving Patient Care Through Medical Humanities

 Since 2003, the University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry’s Department of Medical Humanities and Bioethics has partnered with the Memorial Art Gallery to offer Art and Observation sessions to medical students and health practitioners. This interactive site demonstrates the program’s Five Question Protocol, designed to enhance skills of observation in ways that can be translated to the clinical setting. More on the five question protocol: medhum.digitalscholar.rochester.edu Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL69/

Art and Observation: Improving Patient Care Through Medical Humanities

 Yıl önce

 Since 2003, the University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry’s Department of Medical Humanities and Bioethics has partnered with the Memorial Art Gallery to offer Art and Observation sessions to medical students and health practitioners. This interactive site demonstrates the program’s Five Question Protocol, designed to enhance skills of observation in ways that can be translated to the clinical setting. More on the five question protocol: medhum.digitalscholar.rochester.edu Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL69/

Rare Sheet Music Celebrates Frederick Douglass

 In 1847 Frederick Douglass was getting ready to leave England where he had lived to avoid being recaptured after his escape from enslavement in Maryland. He had crisscrossed Britain for the last 19 months, lecturing on the evils of slavery in his native country. Now that supporters had raised 150 English pounds (about $750 then) to buy his legal freedom, he was able to return to his family in the United States. Yet, his safe passage was by no means guaranteed. To commemorate Douglass’s departure from Britain, his close companion and fellow abolitionist, the Englishwoman Julia Griffiths, wrote the “Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass.” Only two copies of the sheet music are known to exist-and one of them was acquired earlier this year by the University of Rochester’s Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation. In 1847 when Douglass first arrived in Rochester, he found a bustling city of 50,000. It was here that same year that he launched his abolitionist newspaper the North Star. It was also in Rochester that Douglass gave his most famous speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July,” at the majestic Corinthian Hall in 1852. Over the last few decades, the University has assembled one of the world’s leading archival collections of rare Douglass materials, including letters, published speeches, Underground Railroad passes that had been used to smuggle slaves to safety, and other ephemera that document and expand upon Douglass’s history and activity. The collection is part of a larger repository of materials documenting the history of abolition and woman suffrage movements. The copy of Griffiths’s song now owned by the University is tucked inside a well-worn, black cloth book including 16 bound pieces of sheet music. Now referred to as the Francis A. Williams songbook, it bears the name of its former owner stamped in gold lettering on its cover. “Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass” is scored for voice and piano. Griffiths’s brother, the lawyer T. Powis Griffiths, penned the lyrics. Having one’s own sheet music bound was not uncommon in the 19th century, says Autumn Haag, the University’s special collections librarian and archivist for research and collections. What makes this book so valuable is the rarity of the Douglass song. The only other known copy resides at the British Library in London. Subtitled “On Quitting England for America - the Land of His Birth,” the song decries the United States as a brutish country. England is styled as the “land of the free, the land of the brave” while the lyrics lament “Alas! that my country should be America! land of the slave.” The Griffiths imagine the song from Douglass’s perspective, concluding that the abolitionist leader needs to return to America and join the fight against slavery, even if it could spell his death. “Shall I, like a coward, not join the fight? Shrink from the onslaught when battle is raging, Scared by the enemy’s tyrannous might? […] I will fight on till the foe shall have yielded, Or the years of my sojourn on earth have been told,” wrote lawyer Griffiths in Douglass’s imaginary voice. Haag says she is struck by the use of martial imagery and words like “warfare,” “battle,” and “weapon,” especially in the last two verses. “It feels like the lyrics are already foreshadowing the Civil War,” which was to break out 14 years later. The book’s title page shows a stylized image of Douglass, wearing a classical-style toga artfully draped over his left shoulder, meant as an allusion to ancient Greece or Rome. The image, depicting Douglass with a stoic look, sharp jawline, and a bit of a Roman nose, is not a true representation of the man, says Haag. Was it propaganda? she muses. “Propaganda has sometimes negative connotations, but yes. It was written for a purpose.” It was written to remind Douglass’s supporters in England what he was returning home to, and to highlight to abolitionists in the United States the essential difference between the two countries at the time, says Haag. Acquiring the rare sheet music and continually seeking out other historic Douglass materials, “illustrates the University’s commitment to Frederick Douglass’s history and legacy,” notes Jessica Lacher-Feldman, the University’s assistant dean and the Joseph N. Lambert and Harold B. Schleifer Director of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation. “This is part of our stewardship of one of the most significant collections of Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony materials that help us understand the political, social, and cultural history of the abolition and women’s suffrage movements. Rochester was an epicenter for these important movements in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It’s this legacy that connects Rochester and human rights to this day.” Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/myir/

Rare Sheet Music Celebrates Frederick Douglass

 Yıl önce

 In 1847 Frederick Douglass was getting ready to leave England where he had lived to avoid being recaptured after his escape from enslavement in Maryland. He had crisscrossed Britain for the last 19 months, lecturing on the evils of slavery in his native country. Now that supporters had raised 150 English pounds (about $750 then) to buy his legal freedom, he was able to return to his family in the United States. Yet, his safe passage was by no means guaranteed. To commemorate Douglass’s departure from Britain, his close companion and fellow abolitionist, the Englishwoman Julia Griffiths, wrote the “Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass.” Only two copies of the sheet music are known to exist-and one of them was acquired earlier this year by the University of Rochester’s Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation. In 1847 when Douglass first arrived in Rochester, he found a bustling city of 50,000. It was here that same year that he launched his abolitionist newspaper the North Star. It was also in Rochester that Douglass gave his most famous speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July,” at the majestic Corinthian Hall in 1852. Over the last few decades, the University has assembled one of the world’s leading archival collections of rare Douglass materials, including letters, published speeches, Underground Railroad passes that had been used to smuggle slaves to safety, and other ephemera that document and expand upon Douglass’s history and activity. The collection is part of a larger repository of materials documenting the history of abolition and woman suffrage movements. The copy of Griffiths’s song now owned by the University is tucked inside a well-worn, black cloth book including 16 bound pieces of sheet music. Now referred to as the Francis A. Williams songbook, it bears the name of its former owner stamped in gold lettering on its cover. “Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass” is scored for voice and piano. Griffiths’s brother, the lawyer T. Powis Griffiths, penned the lyrics. Having one’s own sheet music bound was not uncommon in the 19th century, says Autumn Haag, the University’s special collections librarian and archivist for research and collections. What makes this book so valuable is the rarity of the Douglass song. The only other known copy resides at the British Library in London. Subtitled “On Quitting England for America - the Land of His Birth,” the song decries the United States as a brutish country. England is styled as the “land of the free, the land of the brave” while the lyrics lament “Alas! that my country should be America! land of the slave.” The Griffiths imagine the song from Douglass’s perspective, concluding that the abolitionist leader needs to return to America and join the fight against slavery, even if it could spell his death. “Shall I, like a coward, not join the fight? Shrink from the onslaught when battle is raging, Scared by the enemy’s tyrannous might? […] I will fight on till the foe shall have yielded, Or the years of my sojourn on earth have been told,” wrote lawyer Griffiths in Douglass’s imaginary voice. Haag says she is struck by the use of martial imagery and words like “warfare,” “battle,” and “weapon,” especially in the last two verses. “It feels like the lyrics are already foreshadowing the Civil War,” which was to break out 14 years later. The book’s title page shows a stylized image of Douglass, wearing a classical-style toga artfully draped over his left shoulder, meant as an allusion to ancient Greece or Rome. The image, depicting Douglass with a stoic look, sharp jawline, and a bit of a Roman nose, is not a true representation of the man, says Haag. Was it propaganda? she muses. “Propaganda has sometimes negative connotations, but yes. It was written for a purpose.” It was written to remind Douglass’s supporters in England what he was returning home to, and to highlight to abolitionists in the United States the essential difference between the two countries at the time, says Haag. Acquiring the rare sheet music and continually seeking out other historic Douglass materials, “illustrates the University’s commitment to Frederick Douglass’s history and legacy,” notes Jessica Lacher-Feldman, the University’s assistant dean and the Joseph N. Lambert and Harold B. Schleifer Director of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation. “This is part of our stewardship of one of the most significant collections of Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony materials that help us understand the political, social, and cultural history of the abolition and women’s suffrage movements. Rochester was an epicenter for these important movements in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It’s this legacy that connects Rochester and human rights to this day.” Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/myir/

A Message from Dean Hall: The Meaning of Meliora

 Dean Donald Hall reflects on the University's motto, how it informs his work, and his vision for Arts, Sciences & Engineering. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mxOQ/

A Message from Dean Hall: The Meaning of Meliora

 Yıl önce

 Dean Donald Hall reflects on the University's motto, how it informs his work, and his vision for Arts, Sciences & Engineering. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mxOQ/

Holiday Card 2018

 Happy New Year! Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFb/

Holiday Card 2018

 Yıl önce

 Happy New Year! Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFb/

2018: The Year in Video

 In any given year, a lot of news happens at the University of Rochester; 2018 was no different. From the enthralling news of Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and former engineering professor Gérard Mourou being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, to the announcement of our next president Sarah Mangelsdorf, there were a number of things to celebrate. There were also plenty of fascinating research stories, with AR, AI, and VR all being big areas for exploration and discovery. And the arts were active as well from the big Monet exhibit at the MAG to the continued excellence of Eastman, delving into new territory with their Contemporary Media and Film Composition major taking off. We'd be remiss if we didn't pay tribute to two of the giants we lost this year, Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, and our own vice president, Paul Burgett, a fixture at the University for more than 50 years. And that was only some of what our cameras rolled on. Here's to "ever better" stories in 2019! Here are the stories (in order of appearance): Scanning Frederick Douglass bust: tr-me.com/videos/video-vblNpSF9-Po.html Scanning the brain to understand language processing: tr-me.com/videos/video-vV5TX843Pcw.html Remembering Louise Slaughter: tr-me.com/videos/video-yZH8_bYawBg.html Chemical engineering car competition: tr-me.com/videos/video-hSPOiRu58Yc.html Eastman Film and Contemporary Media: tr-me.com/videos/video-yMORi_VsLgA.html Simulating a chemical reactor using AR: tr-me.com/videos/video-wkP8R9EiqQM.html Modeling the collapse of alien civilizations: tr-me.com/videos/video-uoISn18qP_E.html Deception of the smile: tr-me.com/videos/video-Jfli-6Q-13Q.html Commencement setup: tr-me.com/videos/video-ZZ0FYQG8NKk.html AS&E Commencement highlights: tr-me.com/videos/video-2FepKgcRkr8.html Rethinking the interferometer: tr-me.com/videos/video-1o0SQD5Y2Oc.html Gelb triplets bring their Rochester story full circle: tr-me.com/videos/video-q6YB82ziXfc.html Rochester's Nobel Prize recipients: www.rochester.edu/newscenter/rochester-represents-at-nobel-prize-ceremony-353002/ Paying tribute to Paul Burgett: tr-me.com/videos/video-WLiOWdytN_s.html The Science Behind Monet's Color: tr-me.com/videos/video-kVv102g7RZY.html Sarah Mangelsdorf announced as our 11th president: tr-me.com/videos/video-kdbqoe7W1dI.html Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2018: The Year in Video

 Yıl önce

 In any given year, a lot of news happens at the University of Rochester; 2018 was no different. From the enthralling news of Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and former engineering professor Gérard Mourou being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, to the announcement of our next president Sarah Mangelsdorf, there were a number of things to celebrate. There were also plenty of fascinating research stories, with AR, AI, and VR all being big areas for exploration and discovery. And the arts were active as well from the big Monet exhibit at the MAG to the continued excellence of Eastman, delving into new territory with their Contemporary Media and Film Composition major taking off. We'd be remiss if we didn't pay tribute to two of the giants we lost this year, Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, and our own vice president, Paul Burgett, a fixture at the University for more than 50 years. And that was only some of what our cameras rolled on. Here's to "ever better" stories in 2019! Here are the stories (in order of appearance): Scanning Frederick Douglass bust: tr-me.com/videos/video-vblNpSF9-Po.html Scanning the brain to understand language processing: tr-me.com/videos/video-vV5TX843Pcw.html Remembering Louise Slaughter: tr-me.com/videos/video-yZH8_bYawBg.html Chemical engineering car competition: tr-me.com/videos/video-hSPOiRu58Yc.html Eastman Film and Contemporary Media: tr-me.com/videos/video-yMORi_VsLgA.html Simulating a chemical reactor using AR: tr-me.com/videos/video-wkP8R9EiqQM.html Modeling the collapse of alien civilizations: tr-me.com/videos/video-uoISn18qP_E.html Deception of the smile: tr-me.com/videos/video-Jfli-6Q-13Q.html Commencement setup: tr-me.com/videos/video-ZZ0FYQG8NKk.html AS&E Commencement highlights: tr-me.com/videos/video-2FepKgcRkr8.html Rethinking the interferometer: tr-me.com/videos/video-1o0SQD5Y2Oc.html Gelb triplets bring their Rochester story full circle: tr-me.com/videos/video-q6YB82ziXfc.html Rochester's Nobel Prize recipients: www.rochester.edu/newscenter/rochester-represents-at-nobel-prize-ceremony-353002/ Paying tribute to Paul Burgett: tr-me.com/videos/video-WLiOWdytN_s.html The Science Behind Monet's Color: tr-me.com/videos/video-kVv102g7RZY.html Sarah Mangelsdorf announced as our 11th president: tr-me.com/videos/video-kdbqoe7W1dI.html Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

HEAL Collaborative: A Resource for Domestic Violence Survivors

 If you feel you are in a dangerous relationship, call 911, the local domestic violence hotline (585) 222-SAFE (7233), or the national hotline at 1-800-799-7233. Victims of interpersonal violence (IPV) in the Rochester area now have a new resource that for the very first time gives them access to social, emotional and legal services all in one place. Overseen by URMC’s Department of Psychiatry and headquartered on the Strong Memorial Hospital campus, the HEAL program is a collective endeavor of URMC and several partnering social service agencies. Collaborators include Willow Domestic Violence Center (formerly Alternatives for Battered Women), the Rochester Police Department, RESOLVE, the Legal Aid Society of Rochester, Lifespan and Monroe Family Court. HEAL clients receive services including safety planning and linkages to emergency shelter, social work consultation and a comprehensive needs assessment, short-term mental health support, assistance in filing petitions for temporary orders of protection and other legal matters, and referrals to community resources. “The positive relationships we share, and the support we’ve received from our community partners, have enabled us to offer a long-overdue, holistic approach to caring for local IPV victims,” said program co-director Catherine (Kate) Cerulli, JD, PhD, associate professor of Psychiatry who also directs the Susan B. Anthony Center and the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization. “It’s a critical step to improving the safety, health, and well-being of violence-involved people.” Cerulli credits her project team and URMC administration for recognizing the need for the program, which was developed as part of Strong Hospital’s improvement plan, and came to fruition after several years of coordination. Whereas IPV victims previously had to navigate the complex system on their own to find shelter and legal advice, identified patients can now be referred directly to HEAL by URMC Emergency physicians, primary care, mental health and Ob-Gyn providers. The program not only does the navigating in partnership with them, it also provides the mental health support many IPV victims desperately need as a result of trauma and abuse. “The program originated from the need to close a very real gap in addressing the complex concerns of IPV patients that often impede their health and can result in repeated emergency visits,” said Cerulli. “The goal is to decrease the burden on patients and on the health care system.” One of the most important aspects of the program is that all HEAL clients complete a confidential intake survey on an iPad that helps providers identify each person’s interwoven physical, psychological and social needs, and tailor resources accordingly. “The HEAL clinic gives the Willow Center’s mobile advocates a’ home base’ inside the hospital to provide essential services for domestic violence survivors,” said Jaime Saunders, president and CEO of Willow Domestic Violence Center. “This model does not exist anywhere else in the nation and puts critical support directly where the need is. Whether it’s a patient receiving routine care, a walk-in patient from the Emergency Department, or the tens of thousands of UR employees, the access barrier is removed.” Heal finance manager and team leader Michelle A. ReQua, a survivor of interpersonal violence, said the program will help people like her who had difficulty navigating the system to escape abuse. “This clinic will help victims understand the cycle of abuse,” said ReQua. “It will help them get the assistance they need, and empower them become liberated from the abuse, mentally and/or physically.” Referrals to HEAL can be made through URMC’s Departments of Emergency, the URMC Primary Care Network (27 locations), as well as the Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pediatrics and Psychiatry. Call 275-HEAL or visit the HEAL website: www.urmc.rochester.edu/mental-health-wellness/adult-services/outpatient/heal.aspx Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFj/

HEAL Collaborative: A Resource for Domestic Violence Survivors

 Yıl önce

 If you feel you are in a dangerous relationship, call 911, the local domestic violence hotline (585) 222-SAFE (7233), or the national hotline at 1-800-799-7233. Victims of interpersonal violence (IPV) in the Rochester area now have a new resource that for the very first time gives them access to social, emotional and legal services all in one place. Overseen by URMC’s Department of Psychiatry and headquartered on the Strong Memorial Hospital campus, the HEAL program is a collective endeavor of URMC and several partnering social service agencies. Collaborators include Willow Domestic Violence Center (formerly Alternatives for Battered Women), the Rochester Police Department, RESOLVE, the Legal Aid Society of Rochester, Lifespan and Monroe Family Court. HEAL clients receive services including safety planning and linkages to emergency shelter, social work consultation and a comprehensive needs assessment, short-term mental health support, assistance in filing petitions for temporary orders of protection and other legal matters, and referrals to community resources. “The positive relationships we share, and the support we’ve received from our community partners, have enabled us to offer a long-overdue, holistic approach to caring for local IPV victims,” said program co-director Catherine (Kate) Cerulli, JD, PhD, associate professor of Psychiatry who also directs the Susan B. Anthony Center and the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization. “It’s a critical step to improving the safety, health, and well-being of violence-involved people.” Cerulli credits her project team and URMC administration for recognizing the need for the program, which was developed as part of Strong Hospital’s improvement plan, and came to fruition after several years of coordination. Whereas IPV victims previously had to navigate the complex system on their own to find shelter and legal advice, identified patients can now be referred directly to HEAL by URMC Emergency physicians, primary care, mental health and Ob-Gyn providers. The program not only does the navigating in partnership with them, it also provides the mental health support many IPV victims desperately need as a result of trauma and abuse. “The program originated from the need to close a very real gap in addressing the complex concerns of IPV patients that often impede their health and can result in repeated emergency visits,” said Cerulli. “The goal is to decrease the burden on patients and on the health care system.” One of the most important aspects of the program is that all HEAL clients complete a confidential intake survey on an iPad that helps providers identify each person’s interwoven physical, psychological and social needs, and tailor resources accordingly. “The HEAL clinic gives the Willow Center’s mobile advocates a’ home base’ inside the hospital to provide essential services for domestic violence survivors,” said Jaime Saunders, president and CEO of Willow Domestic Violence Center. “This model does not exist anywhere else in the nation and puts critical support directly where the need is. Whether it’s a patient receiving routine care, a walk-in patient from the Emergency Department, or the tens of thousands of UR employees, the access barrier is removed.” Heal finance manager and team leader Michelle A. ReQua, a survivor of interpersonal violence, said the program will help people like her who had difficulty navigating the system to escape abuse. “This clinic will help victims understand the cycle of abuse,” said ReQua. “It will help them get the assistance they need, and empower them become liberated from the abuse, mentally and/or physically.” Referrals to HEAL can be made through URMC’s Departments of Emergency, the URMC Primary Care Network (27 locations), as well as the Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pediatrics and Psychiatry. Call 275-HEAL or visit the HEAL website: www.urmc.rochester.edu/mental-health-wellness/adult-services/outpatient/heal.aspx Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFj/

Sarah Mangelsdorf Introduced as Next University President

 Sarah Mangelsdorf was introduced as the 11th president of the University of Rochester at a public event in Rush Rhees Library. Mangelsdorf currently serves as provost for the University of Wisconsin, and will begin her new role here in the summer of 2019. Mangelsdorf spoke on the role of academic institutions to move forward research, the arts, and shaping young people into leaders. She also reflected on the importance of continuing to broaden the University's national and international reputation, while maintaining strong ties to the Rochester community. Following the announcement, Mangelsdorf joined members of the University community at a reception where she met with students, faculty and staff. For more on the Mangelsdorf's appointment, please visit: www.rochester.edu/presidential-search/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mlFD/

Sarah Mangelsdorf Introduced as Next University President

 Yıl önce

 Sarah Mangelsdorf was introduced as the 11th president of the University of Rochester at a public event in Rush Rhees Library. Mangelsdorf currently serves as provost for the University of Wisconsin, and will begin her new role here in the summer of 2019. Mangelsdorf spoke on the role of academic institutions to move forward research, the arts, and shaping young people into leaders. She also reflected on the importance of continuing to broaden the University's national and international reputation, while maintaining strong ties to the Rochester community. Following the announcement, Mangelsdorf joined members of the University community at a reception where she met with students, faculty and staff. For more on the Mangelsdorf's appointment, please visit: www.rochester.edu/presidential-search/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mlFD/

Sarah Mangelsdorf Named University of Rochester President - archived livestream

 The selection of Sarah Mangelsdorf as the eleventh president of the University of Rochester follows an extensive and inclusive search conducted by the University Board of Trustees with input from advisory committees comprised of faculty, students and staff. This video is taken from the livestream of this announcement. More information about Sarah Mangelsdorf and the selection process can be found at rochester.edu/presidential-search/. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mkzz/

Sarah Mangelsdorf Named University of Rochester President - archived livestream

 Yıl önce

 The selection of Sarah Mangelsdorf as the eleventh president of the University of Rochester follows an extensive and inclusive search conducted by the University Board of Trustees with input from advisory committees comprised of faculty, students and staff. This video is taken from the livestream of this announcement. More information about Sarah Mangelsdorf and the selection process can be found at rochester.edu/presidential-search/. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mkzz/

An Introduction to New University President Sarah Mangelsdorf

 Sarah Mangelsdorf has been named the 11th president of the University of Rochester. She comes to Rochester from the University of Wisconsin where she currently serves as the provost. Mangelsdorf will be the first woman to lead the University when she formally takes office in the summer of 2019. For more, please visit: www.rochester.edu/presidential-search/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mkFy/

An Introduction to New University President Sarah Mangelsdorf

 Yıl önce

 Sarah Mangelsdorf has been named the 11th president of the University of Rochester. She comes to Rochester from the University of Wisconsin where she currently serves as the provost. Mangelsdorf will be the first woman to lead the University when she formally takes office in the summer of 2019. For more, please visit: www.rochester.edu/presidential-search/ Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mkFy/

"Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass"- Rare 1847 Music Performed

 "Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass" composed by Julia Griffiths, with lyrics by T. Powis Griffiths in 1847 on the occasion of Frederick Douglass' returning to the United States from the United Kingdom after 19 months abroad. The rare piece of sheet music, only one of two copies known to exist, was acquired by River Campus Libraries Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation in 2018, the bicentennial year of Douglass' birth. Performed by Jonathan Rhodes '20E, tenor Lee Wright '03E, 18E (DMA), piano Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Lyrics (third verse omitted from this performance): Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. 1 What if the Negroes despis’d and degraded And scorn and reproach are heap’d on his head Perish the thought that would leave him unaided American soil shall be that which I tread. Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. [repeat] 2 What if I’ve drunk of the cup that awaits me, One bitter foretaste already, Do I glean from the prospect no thought that elates me, If in freedom’s great cause counted worthy to die. Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. [repeat] 3 Am I not wanted where warfare is waging? Shall I, like a coward, not join the fight? Shrink from the onslaught when battle is raging, Scared by the enemy’s tyrannous might? Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. [repeat] 4 Give me then, friends, the weapon that’s wielded Best in the cause I am sworn to uphold; I will fight on till the foe shall have yielded, Or the years of my sojourn on earth have been told. Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave!

"Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass"- Rare 1847 Music Performed

 Yıl önce

 "Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass" composed by Julia Griffiths, with lyrics by T. Powis Griffiths in 1847 on the occasion of Frederick Douglass' returning to the United States from the United Kingdom after 19 months abroad. The rare piece of sheet music, only one of two copies known to exist, was acquired by River Campus Libraries Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation in 2018, the bicentennial year of Douglass' birth. Performed by Jonathan Rhodes '20E, tenor Lee Wright '03E, 18E (DMA), piano Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Lyrics (third verse omitted from this performance): Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. 1 What if the Negroes despis’d and degraded And scorn and reproach are heap’d on his head Perish the thought that would leave him unaided American soil shall be that which I tread. Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. [repeat] 2 What if I’ve drunk of the cup that awaits me, One bitter foretaste already, Do I glean from the prospect no thought that elates me, If in freedom’s great cause counted worthy to die. Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. [repeat] 3 Am I not wanted where warfare is waging? Shall I, like a coward, not join the fight? Shrink from the onslaught when battle is raging, Scared by the enemy’s tyrannous might? Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave. [repeat] 4 Give me then, friends, the weapon that’s wielded Best in the cause I am sworn to uphold; I will fight on till the foe shall have yielded, Or the years of my sojourn on earth have been told. Farewell to the land of the free! Farewell to the land of the brave. Alas! That my country should be America! Land of the slave!

The Science Behind Monet's Color

 During three trips to London at the turn of the 20th century, Claude Monet painted more than 40 versions of a single scene: the Waterloo Bridge over the Thames River. Monet’s main subject was not the bridge itself, however; he was most captivated by the landscape and atmosphere of the scene, with its transitory light, fog, and mist. Eight paintings from this series of London fogs are the centerpiece of the Memorial Art Gallery’s exhibition “Monet’s Waterloo Bridge: Vision and Process.” A recognized master of landscape painting, Monet was an integral founder of the Impressionist movement, which embraced the philosophy of expressing the fleeting sensory effects in a scene. But how does Monet depict the same scene at different times of day and in various conditions? And how does a viewer see an artist’s brushstrokes of color as a cohesive image, and vastly different colors as the same bridge? With each of the paintings in the series, Monet manipulates viewer perception in a way that scientists at the time did not completely understand. Today, research such as that conducted at the University of Rochester’s Center for Visual Science, founded in 1963, provides insight into the complexity of the visual system, illuminating Monet’s processes and the intricacies of his work. The Memorial Art Gallery partnered with the Carnegie Museum of Art and the Worcester Art Museum to analyze the pigments of color Monet used in his Waterloo Bridges series. They found that Monet used a very limited color palette in his Waterloo Bridge series, but was still able to evoke a wide range of ambiances. How did he do this? The answer involves how our eyes take in wavelengths of light, which our brains interpret, says David Williams, professor of optics at Rochester and the director of Rochester’s Center for Visual Science. In the retina of the eye, there are three types of cones: blue, which is sensitive to short wavelengths of light; green, which is medium-wavelength sensitive; and red, which is long-wavelength sensitive. Each type of cone either reflects or absorbs the various wavelengths of light. These trichromatic signals “are very simple, yet the million shades of color that we experience are derived from just those three,” says Williams, who, in the 1990s, was the first person to image all three kinds of cones in a living human retina and identify how the cones are arranged. From the retina, signals travel along the optic nerve to the visual cortex, one of the most primitive areas in the back of the brain. Signals are then transmitted back and forth between the visual cortex and other higher-level parts of the brain, including those involved in attention, memory, experience, and biases. The brain’s job is to integrate sensory information from the eyes into pieces-lines, shapes, and depth-and construct them into objects and scenes. The illumination of an object, for example, can alter perception. That’s because what arrives at our eyes when viewing an object is a combination of both the illumination falling on the object and the intrinsic properties of the object itself, Williams says. “Your brain has a real challenge, which is to figure out what is true about this object even though what arrives at your eye is radically different depending on how it is illuminated.” When you take an object like a white sheet of paper, it will always be intrinsically white-a phenomenon known as color constancy. If you put the paper outside, it will still be white in the morning light, in the middle of the day, and when the sun goes down, although “if we were to make objective measurements of the light entering your eye in those various circumstances, they would be very different,” he says. The Waterloo Bridge itself never changes color, but Monet paints it using color in different luminance (brightness), value (a color’s relative lightness or darkness), and intensity (a color’s saturation) to depict sunrise, direct sunlight, and dusk. The brain is able to take in the illumination washing over the entire scene, integrate information, and make inferences. If objects have a bluish cast, for instance, the brain is able to infer that it is most likely daytime. If objects have a reddish cast, the brain infers that sunset is most likely approaching, Williams says. Ultimately, “Monet was highlighting how different an object can be, depending on how it is illuminated. But any normally sited person looking at this series will know: the bridge is gray brick, no matter what time of day it is.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mhuZ/

The Science Behind Monet's Color

 Yıl önce

 During three trips to London at the turn of the 20th century, Claude Monet painted more than 40 versions of a single scene: the Waterloo Bridge over the Thames River. Monet’s main subject was not the bridge itself, however; he was most captivated by the landscape and atmosphere of the scene, with its transitory light, fog, and mist. Eight paintings from this series of London fogs are the centerpiece of the Memorial Art Gallery’s exhibition “Monet’s Waterloo Bridge: Vision and Process.” A recognized master of landscape painting, Monet was an integral founder of the Impressionist movement, which embraced the philosophy of expressing the fleeting sensory effects in a scene. But how does Monet depict the same scene at different times of day and in various conditions? And how does a viewer see an artist’s brushstrokes of color as a cohesive image, and vastly different colors as the same bridge? With each of the paintings in the series, Monet manipulates viewer perception in a way that scientists at the time did not completely understand. Today, research such as that conducted at the University of Rochester’s Center for Visual Science, founded in 1963, provides insight into the complexity of the visual system, illuminating Monet’s processes and the intricacies of his work. The Memorial Art Gallery partnered with the Carnegie Museum of Art and the Worcester Art Museum to analyze the pigments of color Monet used in his Waterloo Bridges series. They found that Monet used a very limited color palette in his Waterloo Bridge series, but was still able to evoke a wide range of ambiances. How did he do this? The answer involves how our eyes take in wavelengths of light, which our brains interpret, says David Williams, professor of optics at Rochester and the director of Rochester’s Center for Visual Science. In the retina of the eye, there are three types of cones: blue, which is sensitive to short wavelengths of light; green, which is medium-wavelength sensitive; and red, which is long-wavelength sensitive. Each type of cone either reflects or absorbs the various wavelengths of light. These trichromatic signals “are very simple, yet the million shades of color that we experience are derived from just those three,” says Williams, who, in the 1990s, was the first person to image all three kinds of cones in a living human retina and identify how the cones are arranged. From the retina, signals travel along the optic nerve to the visual cortex, one of the most primitive areas in the back of the brain. Signals are then transmitted back and forth between the visual cortex and other higher-level parts of the brain, including those involved in attention, memory, experience, and biases. The brain’s job is to integrate sensory information from the eyes into pieces-lines, shapes, and depth-and construct them into objects and scenes. The illumination of an object, for example, can alter perception. That’s because what arrives at our eyes when viewing an object is a combination of both the illumination falling on the object and the intrinsic properties of the object itself, Williams says. “Your brain has a real challenge, which is to figure out what is true about this object even though what arrives at your eye is radically different depending on how it is illuminated.” When you take an object like a white sheet of paper, it will always be intrinsically white-a phenomenon known as color constancy. If you put the paper outside, it will still be white in the morning light, in the middle of the day, and when the sun goes down, although “if we were to make objective measurements of the light entering your eye in those various circumstances, they would be very different,” he says. The Waterloo Bridge itself never changes color, but Monet paints it using color in different luminance (brightness), value (a color’s relative lightness or darkness), and intensity (a color’s saturation) to depict sunrise, direct sunlight, and dusk. The brain is able to take in the illumination washing over the entire scene, integrate information, and make inferences. If objects have a bluish cast, for instance, the brain is able to infer that it is most likely daytime. If objects have a reddish cast, the brain infers that sunset is most likely approaching, Williams says. Ultimately, “Monet was highlighting how different an object can be, depending on how it is illuminated. But any normally sited person looking at this series will know: the bridge is gray brick, no matter what time of day it is.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mhuZ/

Congratulations from Katie Dunn, Sarah Walters and Yiwen E to Donna Strickland

 Katie Dunn and Sarah Williams are PhD students at the Institute of Optics, where Yiwen E works as a post-doc. Dunn is studying angular scattering from single cells; Williams is studying the application of two-photon fluorescent imaging in the retina; and E is working on broadband terahertz wave generation from liquid water. These young physicists gathered to extend congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music by Doctor Turtle: "Stuff Will Never Love You Back" Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mcN3/

Congratulations from Katie Dunn, Sarah Walters and Yiwen E to Donna Strickland

 Yıl önce

 Katie Dunn and Sarah Williams are PhD students at the Institute of Optics, where Yiwen E works as a post-doc. Dunn is studying angular scattering from single cells; Williams is studying the application of two-photon fluorescent imaging in the retina; and E is working on broadband terahertz wave generation from liquid water. These young physicists gathered to extend congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music by Doctor Turtle: "Stuff Will Never Love You Back" Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mcN3/

Congratulations from Sara Bucht to Donna Strickland

 Sara Bucht is a PhD student studying physics at the Institute of Optics, building on the research of Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Birds" by Dee Yan-Key; Creative Commons Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mcN4/

Congratulations from Sara Bucht to Donna Strickland

 Yıl önce

 Sara Bucht is a PhD student studying physics at the Institute of Optics, building on the research of Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Birds" by Dee Yan-Key; Creative Commons Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mcN4/

Congratulations from Rich Feldman to Donna Strickland

 University president Rich Feldman extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD), winner of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Winter Chimes" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFn/

Congratulations from Rich Feldman to Donna Strickland

 Yıl önce

 University president Rich Feldman extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD), winner of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Winter Chimes" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBTFn/

Congratulations from Scott Carney to Donna Strickland and Gérard Mourou

 Scott Carney, the director of the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester, extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics(LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Heartwarming" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Congratulations from Scott Carney to Donna Strickland and Gérard Mourou

 Yıl önce

 Scott Carney, the director of the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester, extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics(LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Heartwarming" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Congratulations from Wayne Knox to Donna Strickland and Gérard Mourou

 Optics professor Wayne Knox extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Happy Rock" by bensound Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Congratulations from Wayne Knox to Donna Strickland and Gérard Mourou

 Yıl önce

 Optics professor Wayne Knox extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD) and Gérard Mourou, winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Happy Rock" by bensound Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Congratulations from Wendi Heinzelman to Donna Strickland

 Wendi Heinzelman, the dean of the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD), winner of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Gérard Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Divertimento K131" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Congratulations from Wendi Heinzelman to Donna Strickland

 Yıl önce

 Wendi Heinzelman, the dean of the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, extends warm congratulations to Donna Strickland '89 (PhD), winner of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland earned her doctorate at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) with Gérard Mourou, an LLE scientist, as her graduate advisor. They were honored for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA), a means of increasing the power of laser pulses. CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music: "Divertimento K131" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Congratulations from Jen Kruschwitz to Donna Strickland

 Jen Kruschwitz, associate professor of optics at the University of Rochester's Institute of Optics, extends warm congratulations to her friend Donna Strickland '89 (PhD). Strickland and Gerard Mourou, her former graduate advisor and a scientist at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in the 1980s, have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA). CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and the accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music "Photo Album" by bensound.com Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Congratulations from Jen Kruschwitz to Donna Strickland

 Yıl önce

 Jen Kruschwitz, associate professor of optics at the University of Rochester's Institute of Optics, extends warm congratulations to her friend Donna Strickland '89 (PhD). Strickland and Gerard Mourou, her former graduate advisor and a scientist at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in the 1980s, have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work developing chirped pulse amplification (CPA). CPA has enabled the modern high-powered precision laser and the accompanying research capabilities, along with LASIK eye surgery, smartphone screens, and other aspects of daily life we now take for granted. Music "Photo Album" by bensound.com Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Nik Angyal Named Academic All-American of the Year

 Nik Angyal '19, a defender on the men's soccer team, has been named the 2018 Google Cloud Academic All-America® Team Member of the Year for Division III Men’s Soccer. Angyal was also named a First Team Academic All-American by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). Angyal was previously named as the winner of the men’s Elite 90 Award by the NCAA at the 2018 Division III Final Four. The Elite 90 Award is presented to the student-athlete with the highest cumulative grade point average among all of the athletes at the finals site. Angyal is majoring in chemical engineering. He has a cumulative GPA of 4.00. He was selected as an Academic All-American in 2017, elected to the Second Team. He became Rochester’s 100th Academic All-American. Last year, Angyal was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, the internationally renowned honor society, and Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society. He is in his second year as a teaching assistant in fluid dynamics and has done so for organic chemistry. Angyal has participated in research in the chemical engineering department developing an electrolyte for use in lithium-ion batteries, as well as interning with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation. His volunteer experience includes working with his local soccer club in Dutchess County and serving as a tutor at the Rochester International Academy. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/m9Bg/

Nik Angyal Named Academic All-American of the Year

 Yıl önce

 Nik Angyal '19, a defender on the men's soccer team, has been named the 2018 Google Cloud Academic All-America® Team Member of the Year for Division III Men’s Soccer. Angyal was also named a First Team Academic All-American by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). Angyal was previously named as the winner of the men’s Elite 90 Award by the NCAA at the 2018 Division III Final Four. The Elite 90 Award is presented to the student-athlete with the highest cumulative grade point average among all of the athletes at the finals site. Angyal is majoring in chemical engineering. He has a cumulative GPA of 4.00. He was selected as an Academic All-American in 2017, elected to the Second Team. He became Rochester’s 100th Academic All-American. Last year, Angyal was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, the internationally renowned honor society, and Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society. He is in his second year as a teaching assistant in fluid dynamics and has done so for organic chemistry. Angyal has participated in research in the chemical engineering department developing an electrolyte for use in lithium-ion batteries, as well as interning with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation. His volunteer experience includes working with his local soccer club in Dutchess County and serving as a tutor at the Rochester International Academy. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/m9Bg/

A Message from Dean Hall: Launching a Video Series

 Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/m7cQ/

A Message from Dean Hall: Launching a Video Series

 Yıl önce

 Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/m7cQ/

A Message from Dean Hall: An Introduction

 Dean Donald Hall introduces himself to the University community and invites thoughts on the future of Arts, Sciences & Engineering. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/m7cR/

A Message from Dean Hall: An Introduction

 Yıl önce

 Dean Donald Hall introduces himself to the University community and invites thoughts on the future of Arts, Sciences & Engineering. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/m7cR/

NBA Legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Visits Campus

 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, a basketball icon, activist, author, actor, and ambassador, visited the University of Rochester’s River Campus on November 5, 2018. In addition to speaking to a packed house at the Louis Alexander Palestra, he addressed the media and also took part in a roundtable discussion with students. His talk is the first in a series called Dean’s Initiative: Difficult Conversations as a Catalyst for Change, presented by Donald Hall, the University’s Robert L. and Mary L. Sproull Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Sciences & Engineering. Abdul-Jabbar’s speech is called “Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality Beyond Black & White.” He discussed issues that are dividing America-racism, economic inequality, social injustice, and the power of the media-while drawing upon his personal experiences as an African-American and Muslim. He also focused on the solutions that could unite people and inspire younger generations to continue the path toward change. The 7-foot-2 Abdul-Jabbar is among the most successful and versatile athletes in sports history. Born Lew Alcindor in New York City, he won three consecutive national college basketball titles at UCLA, and six National Basketball Association titles with the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers. He remains the NBA’s all-time leading scorer, with 38,387 points and was inducted into the Pro Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995. A strong supporter of boxer Muhammad Ali’s refusal to join the war in Vietnam, he converted to Sunni Islam in 1968 and refused to try out for the US Olympic basketball team that summer in protest to the unequal treatment of African-Americans. He began using the name Kareem Abdul-Jabbar-which means “the noble one, servant of the Almighty”-in 1971. He has been a regular media contributor to discussions about issues of race and religion, has written several nonfiction books, and recently joined the writing team for Hulu’s reboot of Veronica Mars. In 2012, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton named Abdul-Jabbar a cultural ambassador for the United States, and he traveled the world promoting the importance of education, social and racial tolerance, and cultural understanding, using sports as a means of empowerment. In 2016, President Obama appointed Abdul-Jabbar to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition and presented him with the presidential medal of freedom, the highest civilian award of the United States. Abdul-Jabbar’s acting career began with a role in the 1972 Bruce Lee film Game of Death, and his resume includes cult movies Airplane! and Fletch. He also has made appearances in TV classics such as Full House, Everybody Loves Raymond and Diff’rent Strokes, and last spring he was a contestant on ABC’s Dancing with the Stars. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mOSp/

NBA Legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Visits Campus

 Yıl önce

 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, a basketball icon, activist, author, actor, and ambassador, visited the University of Rochester’s River Campus on November 5, 2018. In addition to speaking to a packed house at the Louis Alexander Palestra, he addressed the media and also took part in a roundtable discussion with students. His talk is the first in a series called Dean’s Initiative: Difficult Conversations as a Catalyst for Change, presented by Donald Hall, the University’s Robert L. and Mary L. Sproull Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Sciences & Engineering. Abdul-Jabbar’s speech is called “Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality Beyond Black & White.” He discussed issues that are dividing America-racism, economic inequality, social injustice, and the power of the media-while drawing upon his personal experiences as an African-American and Muslim. He also focused on the solutions that could unite people and inspire younger generations to continue the path toward change. The 7-foot-2 Abdul-Jabbar is among the most successful and versatile athletes in sports history. Born Lew Alcindor in New York City, he won three consecutive national college basketball titles at UCLA, and six National Basketball Association titles with the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers. He remains the NBA’s all-time leading scorer, with 38,387 points and was inducted into the Pro Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995. A strong supporter of boxer Muhammad Ali’s refusal to join the war in Vietnam, he converted to Sunni Islam in 1968 and refused to try out for the US Olympic basketball team that summer in protest to the unequal treatment of African-Americans. He began using the name Kareem Abdul-Jabbar-which means “the noble one, servant of the Almighty”-in 1971. He has been a regular media contributor to discussions about issues of race and religion, has written several nonfiction books, and recently joined the writing team for Hulu’s reboot of Veronica Mars. In 2012, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton named Abdul-Jabbar a cultural ambassador for the United States, and he traveled the world promoting the importance of education, social and racial tolerance, and cultural understanding, using sports as a means of empowerment. In 2016, President Obama appointed Abdul-Jabbar to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition and presented him with the presidential medal of freedom, the highest civilian award of the United States. Abdul-Jabbar’s acting career began with a role in the 1972 Bruce Lee film Game of Death, and his resume includes cult movies Airplane! and Fletch. He also has made appearances in TV classics such as Full House, Everybody Loves Raymond and Diff’rent Strokes, and last spring he was a contestant on ABC’s Dancing with the Stars. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mOSp/

A Playground for Artists

 It once stood as a school, where students walked the hallways, and learned the periodic tables inside its classrooms. Nearly a century after its construction, and decades since it has been a school, the old Medina High School is now a playground of sorts. At least that's the name that curators gave to a collection of 29 installations in the massive Victorian era brick building. The project (which has officially been named PLAY/GROUND) originally came about when the building owners, who plan to redevelop the school into apartments, wanted to draw public attention to the space. So they invited the principals of Resource Art in Buffalo to put out a call for work, staging art installations to be built on site. The call stipulated that the work would have to be done over the course of one week, and up for only one weekend, then dismantled completely. Both the space and the constraints of the event spurred a huge variety of work from artists all over the region, right down to New York City and all the way up to Toronto. For Allen Topolski, an associate professor of art at the University of Rochester, the opportunity was the perfect place to explore his interest in memory. Topolski is both a sculptor, and an aficionado of old objects that often have esoteric uses and origins. His work is as much about the process of discovery and creation as it is about the final piece, so having the opportunity to create something that would be so fleeting, not unlike memory, seemed fitting. It was also the perfect way to reflect on a high school experience of his own, watching his grandmother grapple with the loss of her memory due to Alzheimer's disease. For Topolski, and likely for the other artists, this was less about creating a lasting physical presence, than a mental image that audience could take with them. In a way, it's was an exercise in facilitating and directing the process of memory creation itself. In a building with so many echoes of an era gone by, It's hard to imagine a better way to transition from one use to another. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

A Playground for Artists

 Yıl önce

 It once stood as a school, where students walked the hallways, and learned the periodic tables inside its classrooms. Nearly a century after its construction, and decades since it has been a school, the old Medina High School is now a playground of sorts. At least that's the name that curators gave to a collection of 29 installations in the massive Victorian era brick building. The project (which has officially been named PLAY/GROUND) originally came about when the building owners, who plan to redevelop the school into apartments, wanted to draw public attention to the space. So they invited the principals of Resource Art in Buffalo to put out a call for work, staging art installations to be built on site. The call stipulated that the work would have to be done over the course of one week, and up for only one weekend, then dismantled completely. Both the space and the constraints of the event spurred a huge variety of work from artists all over the region, right down to New York City and all the way up to Toronto. For Allen Topolski, an associate professor of art at the University of Rochester, the opportunity was the perfect place to explore his interest in memory. Topolski is both a sculptor, and an aficionado of old objects that often have esoteric uses and origins. His work is as much about the process of discovery and creation as it is about the final piece, so having the opportunity to create something that would be so fleeting, not unlike memory, seemed fitting. It was also the perfect way to reflect on a high school experience of his own, watching his grandmother grapple with the loss of her memory due to Alzheimer's disease. For Topolski, and likely for the other artists, this was less about creating a lasting physical presence, than a mental image that audience could take with them. In a way, it's was an exercise in facilitating and directing the process of memory creation itself. In a building with so many echoes of an era gone by, It's hard to imagine a better way to transition from one use to another. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Remembering Paul Burgett

 Paul Burgett-musician, scholar, teacher, and University leader for over half a century- was among the most beloved figures in the Rochester community, familiar to generations of students for his famous "Fiery Furnace" talk that he gave each fall to first-year students. Words from that well-known talk are perhaps the most fitting way to remember him, and to distill his enormous influence and varied life's work into the message closest to his heart-inspiring young people to pursue their passions. Burgett, who arrived at the University’s Eastman School of Music in 1964 from St. Louis as a first-year student, became one of Rochester’s most prominent and beloved figures. During a University career that spanned 54 years, he served in an extraordinary number of key roles: student body president at Eastman, faculty member in the Department of Music, dean of students at Eastman and for the University, advisor to four University presidents, a University vice president, and general secretary to the University’s Board of Trustees. Along the way, he steeped himself in the history of the University, becoming the leading storyteller of the institution. To generations of students, alumni, parents, and friends, he was the face of Rochester. Known almost universally as Dean Burgett, he was widely admired for his rapport with students and community constituencies, his unabashed affection for the University and the influence the institution and its people had on his own life, and for his unflagging commitment to holding Rochester and the members of its community to the ideals of its motto, Meliora. Supported by his musician parents (his mother an organist, his father a concert baritone), Burgett auditioned for Eastman while in St. Louis and began his studies in the fall of 1964 as a member of the Class of 1968. After graduating in 1968, Burgett was offered a fellowship to work on his doctorate but postponed his studies to join the US Army Reserves, where he played the tuba in a military band. He returned to his studies at Eastman after serving as executive director of the Hochstein School of Music and Drama. For his doctorate in 1976, Burgett explored the music of black classical composers, a subject that until that point had not been much chronicled but one that his advisor, Paul Lehman, enthusiastically supported. His finished dissertation was titled “Aesthetics of the Music of Black Americans: A Critical Analysis of the Writings of Selected Black Scholars with the Implications for Black Music Studies and for Music Education.” Burgett was named dean of students at Eastman in 1981 and drew on his own experience to improve student programs, including planning for Eastman’s Student Living Center. At Eastman, he first began giving his signature presentation, now known as “The Fiery Furnace.” In the address, which he continued to present to first-year students and was scheduled to deliver again this fall, he describes a University education as a journey that students embark on, one in which they will have to confront ideas and perspectives, challenges and opportunities that will mold their character. Education is, he noted, much like a furnace, a prospect that can seem terrifying. “But you will step out of that furnace strong, tempered like steel,” he told students, also promising “We will not abandon you. We will never abandon you.” In the speech, he articulated what became something of a mantra as he helped students find their path in life. “Passion and ability drive ambition,” he often said, noting that picking a major is not nearly as important as caring deeply about a topic so much that you tap into and develop your abilities to find success. Throughout his tenure, he regularly taught two popular undergraduate classes- Music of Black Americans and History of Jazz - as a faculty member in the Department of Music in the School of Arts & Sciences. In a 2010 Rochester Review article titled “101 Things to Do Before You Graduate,” writer Dana Hilfinger ’10 cited Burgett’s History of Jazz class as No. 12. In 2016, the University named the Paul J. Burgett Intercultural Center in recognition of Burgett’s long service, a tenure in which-as a board resolution notes-he was a “tireless advocate for justice and equity for all.” Delighted with the honor, Burgett wrote a note of thanks in which he said he was “an intercultural product . . . from birth.” As he stepped away from his role as an administrator-a label he often eschewed-he turned his attention to the history of the University. He took on the role of University storyteller, often traveling to alumni gatherings around the country to make presentations about the institution that meant so much to him: “Where we came from, who our predecessors were, on whose shoulders we stand, and our responsibilities as stewards of their legacy.” Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL60/

Remembering Paul Burgett

 Yıl önce

 Paul Burgett-musician, scholar, teacher, and University leader for over half a century- was among the most beloved figures in the Rochester community, familiar to generations of students for his famous "Fiery Furnace" talk that he gave each fall to first-year students. Words from that well-known talk are perhaps the most fitting way to remember him, and to distill his enormous influence and varied life's work into the message closest to his heart-inspiring young people to pursue their passions. Burgett, who arrived at the University’s Eastman School of Music in 1964 from St. Louis as a first-year student, became one of Rochester’s most prominent and beloved figures. During a University career that spanned 54 years, he served in an extraordinary number of key roles: student body president at Eastman, faculty member in the Department of Music, dean of students at Eastman and for the University, advisor to four University presidents, a University vice president, and general secretary to the University’s Board of Trustees. Along the way, he steeped himself in the history of the University, becoming the leading storyteller of the institution. To generations of students, alumni, parents, and friends, he was the face of Rochester. Known almost universally as Dean Burgett, he was widely admired for his rapport with students and community constituencies, his unabashed affection for the University and the influence the institution and its people had on his own life, and for his unflagging commitment to holding Rochester and the members of its community to the ideals of its motto, Meliora. Supported by his musician parents (his mother an organist, his father a concert baritone), Burgett auditioned for Eastman while in St. Louis and began his studies in the fall of 1964 as a member of the Class of 1968. After graduating in 1968, Burgett was offered a fellowship to work on his doctorate but postponed his studies to join the US Army Reserves, where he played the tuba in a military band. He returned to his studies at Eastman after serving as executive director of the Hochstein School of Music and Drama. For his doctorate in 1976, Burgett explored the music of black classical composers, a subject that until that point had not been much chronicled but one that his advisor, Paul Lehman, enthusiastically supported. His finished dissertation was titled “Aesthetics of the Music of Black Americans: A Critical Analysis of the Writings of Selected Black Scholars with the Implications for Black Music Studies and for Music Education.” Burgett was named dean of students at Eastman in 1981 and drew on his own experience to improve student programs, including planning for Eastman’s Student Living Center. At Eastman, he first began giving his signature presentation, now known as “The Fiery Furnace.” In the address, which he continued to present to first-year students and was scheduled to deliver again this fall, he describes a University education as a journey that students embark on, one in which they will have to confront ideas and perspectives, challenges and opportunities that will mold their character. Education is, he noted, much like a furnace, a prospect that can seem terrifying. “But you will step out of that furnace strong, tempered like steel,” he told students, also promising “We will not abandon you. We will never abandon you.” In the speech, he articulated what became something of a mantra as he helped students find their path in life. “Passion and ability drive ambition,” he often said, noting that picking a major is not nearly as important as caring deeply about a topic so much that you tap into and develop your abilities to find success. Throughout his tenure, he regularly taught two popular undergraduate classes- Music of Black Americans and History of Jazz - as a faculty member in the Department of Music in the School of Arts & Sciences. In a 2010 Rochester Review article titled “101 Things to Do Before You Graduate,” writer Dana Hilfinger ’10 cited Burgett’s History of Jazz class as No. 12. In 2016, the University named the Paul J. Burgett Intercultural Center in recognition of Burgett’s long service, a tenure in which-as a board resolution notes-he was a “tireless advocate for justice and equity for all.” Delighted with the honor, Burgett wrote a note of thanks in which he said he was “an intercultural product . . . from birth.” As he stepped away from his role as an administrator-a label he often eschewed-he turned his attention to the history of the University. He took on the role of University storyteller, often traveling to alumni gatherings around the country to make presentations about the institution that meant so much to him: “Where we came from, who our predecessors were, on whose shoulders we stand, and our responsibilities as stewards of their legacy.” Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL60/

Why We Voted

 They voted here, they voted absentee ballot; but most of all, they voted. Rochester students tell us why they made the effort to vote in the 2018 midterm elections. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mOSq/

Why We Voted

 Yıl önce

 They voted here, they voted absentee ballot; but most of all, they voted. Rochester students tell us why they made the effort to vote in the 2018 midterm elections. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mOSq/

2018 Polish Film Festival: Selected Trailers

 The Polish Film Festival, now in its 11th year, presents classic cinema, as well as contemporary works produced by the newest generation of the country’s filmmakers. The films featured here represent some of the eclectic mix that will be screened during the second part of the festival, which takes place at the The Little Theatre and Dryden Theatre from November 6th through November 11, 2018. For more information about the festival and a complete list of films, please visit: bit.ly/2zmyhBv Films featured in this video (in order of appearance): Loving Vincent (2017), Dirs. Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman Cold War (2018), Dir. Paweł Pawlikowski The Butler (2018), Dir. Filip Bajon Clergy (2018), Dir. Wojciech Smarzowski Breaking the Limits (2017), Dir. Łukasz Palkowski 303 Squadron (2018), Dir. Denis Delić Silent Night (2017), Dir. Piotr Domalewski Spoor (2017), Dirs. Agnieszka Holland, Kasia Adamik Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mOSs/

2018 Polish Film Festival: Selected Trailers

 Yıl önce

 The Polish Film Festival, now in its 11th year, presents classic cinema, as well as contemporary works produced by the newest generation of the country’s filmmakers. The films featured here represent some of the eclectic mix that will be screened during the second part of the festival, which takes place at the The Little Theatre and Dryden Theatre from November 6th through November 11, 2018. For more information about the festival and a complete list of films, please visit: bit.ly/2zmyhBv Films featured in this video (in order of appearance): Loving Vincent (2017), Dirs. Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman Cold War (2018), Dir. Paweł Pawlikowski The Butler (2018), Dir. Filip Bajon Clergy (2018), Dir. Wojciech Smarzowski Breaking the Limits (2017), Dir. Łukasz Palkowski 303 Squadron (2018), Dir. Denis Delić Silent Night (2017), Dir. Piotr Domalewski Spoor (2017), Dirs. Agnieszka Holland, Kasia Adamik Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/mOSs/

The 2018 Goergen Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

 This year’s recipients of the 2018 Goergen Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching are Hayley Clatterbuck, an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy; Michael Jarvis, an associate professor in the Department of History; and John Lambropoulos, chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The award was established in 1997 by University trustee and Board Chair Emeritus Robert Goergen ’60 and his wife, Pamela, and recognizes distinctive teaching accomplishments of faculty in Arts, Sciences & Engineering. The award aims to acknowledge the full scope of work that contributes to excellence in undergraduate education. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/lqSC/

The 2018 Goergen Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

 Yıl önce

 This year’s recipients of the 2018 Goergen Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching are Hayley Clatterbuck, an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy; Michael Jarvis, an associate professor in the Department of History; and John Lambropoulos, chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The award was established in 1997 by University trustee and Board Chair Emeritus Robert Goergen ’60 and his wife, Pamela, and recognizes distinctive teaching accomplishments of faculty in Arts, Sciences & Engineering. The award aims to acknowledge the full scope of work that contributes to excellence in undergraduate education. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/lqSC/

Spikeball: The most popular game you've never heard of

 Maybe you've been an avid spikeball player for years. Maybe you've seen it being played, but had no idea what it was. Maybe you even call it something else, like roundnet. Whatever the case, spikeball has become one of the more popular games on college campuses and beyond. We wanted to find out how much people know about this fast-paced game, which looks like a lot of fun, but might just be way harder than you think. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Spikeball: The most popular game you've never heard of

 Yıl önce

 Maybe you've been an avid spikeball player for years. Maybe you've seen it being played, but had no idea what it was. Maybe you even call it something else, like roundnet. Whatever the case, spikeball has become one of the more popular games on college campuses and beyond. We wanted to find out how much people know about this fast-paced game, which looks like a lot of fun, but might just be way harder than you think. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Then and Now: A Look Back at WRUR

 Joyce Timmerman Gilbert '58 takes us down memory lane as Molly Robins '20, current Chief Engineer and DJ, gives her a tour of WRUR. Gilbert was a station manager during her time in the 1950s, just as the campus went co-educational and the women's radio club at Cutler Union joined forces with the men running the station in Todd Union. Touring the station with its computerized equipment and teeming library of CDs, her reaction of "It's a different world!" is combined with admiration for the training and collaboration provided by WXXI. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL6Z/

Then and Now: A Look Back at WRUR

 Yıl önce

 Joyce Timmerman Gilbert '58 takes us down memory lane as Molly Robins '20, current Chief Engineer and DJ, gives her a tour of WRUR. Gilbert was a station manager during her time in the 1950s, just as the campus went co-educational and the women's radio club at Cutler Union joined forces with the men running the station in Todd Union. Touring the station with its computerized equipment and teeming library of CDs, her reaction of "It's a different world!" is combined with admiration for the training and collaboration provided by WXXI. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL6Z/

Q&A: University President Richard Feldman speaks with neurologist Dr. Erika Augustine

 The collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to research in neurological disorders at the University of Rochester drives the search for answers and the discovery of new solutions to some of the world’s most devastating diseases. One specific area of impact is the significant contributions to Parkinson’s disease through research conducted at the University. The Medical Center has played a leadership role in virtually every drug being used to treat the neurodegenerative disorder, taking Parkinson’s from a death sentence to a more manageable chronic illness. University President Richard Feldman speaks with neurologist Dr. Erika Augustine about how researchers are harnessing technology to transform discoveries into new ways to treat neurological diseases. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL63/

Q&A: University President Richard Feldman speaks with neurologist Dr. Erika Augustine

 Yıl önce

 The collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to research in neurological disorders at the University of Rochester drives the search for answers and the discovery of new solutions to some of the world’s most devastating diseases. One specific area of impact is the significant contributions to Parkinson’s disease through research conducted at the University. The Medical Center has played a leadership role in virtually every drug being used to treat the neurodegenerative disorder, taking Parkinson’s from a death sentence to a more manageable chronic illness. University President Richard Feldman speaks with neurologist Dr. Erika Augustine about how researchers are harnessing technology to transform discoveries into new ways to treat neurological diseases. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL63/

Activity Fair 2018-Something (and More) for Everyone

 This year's Fall Activity Fair was a hive of activity, with dozens of organizations tabling and talking (and sometimes dancing, playing ukeleles, or juggling) on Wilson Quad. The Fair showcases campus clubs, organizations, and groups open to students across a spectrum of interests from karate to robotics to a variety of dance forms, with options for exploring or bonding with a plethora of faith groups and ethnically based clubs. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/lPWO/

Activity Fair 2018-Something (and More) for Everyone

 Yıl önce

 This year's Fall Activity Fair was a hive of activity, with dozens of organizations tabling and talking (and sometimes dancing, playing ukeleles, or juggling) on Wilson Quad. The Fair showcases campus clubs, organizations, and groups open to students across a spectrum of interests from karate to robotics to a variety of dance forms, with options for exploring or bonding with a plethora of faith groups and ethnically based clubs. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/lPWO/

Pursuing Their Passions: Class of 2022

 As the academic year begins, we welcome the class of 2022 by introducing just a handful of its members. Olivia Alger is an English major from Lake Bluff, Illinois, just outside of Chicago. She says that despite getting rejection letters when she applied for college as a high school senior, she didn't let it discourage her. She took a gap year, part of which she spent in France teaching refugees, an experience that was not without its challenges, but one she loved. Having found a passion for writing from an early age, she came across Rochester and found immediate support for her goals and aspirations and is excited to find a new community from the diverse campus here. Lucy Farnham grew up right here in Rochester, attending Wilson Magnet High School, where she took part in the International Baccalaureate program. She plans to major in Spanish, and possibly Japanese as a second major. The international makeup of campus and the Rochester Curriculum were big draws for her, allowing her to explore what most interests her and her love of different cultures. She says that although her mother attended college, she never finished, so being the first in her family to earn a college degree would be an honor for her, and for her parents who have been a huge support in getting here. Adrian Jackson is from Austin, Texas and is a viola performance major at the Eastman School of Music. He didn't start playing the viola until the middle of his freshman year in high school, but with some hard work, he managed to land at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, and ultimately get accepted at Eastman. He's the first in his family to attend college and says coming to Eastman is a dream come true, to be able to perform the classical repertoire that has become his passion. Befikadu Mekonnen is a biomedical engineering major from Nazaret, Ethiopia. His connection to the University goes back a few years when a mysterious illness left him and his parents searching for answers and not finding many, until he met Dr. RIck Hodes, a 1982 graduate of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Dr. Hodes lives and works in Ethiopia, and turned out to be one of the few people able to diagnose Befikadu with rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbit, a type of cancer in his eye. Thanks to Dr. Hodes and the tests done at the URMC pathology department, Befikadu got his life saving treatment in the US. He says that connection led him here, where he hopes to study medicine and help people, just like Dr. Hodes helped him. Prajita Shrestha is an epidemiology major from Kathmandu, Nepal. She comes to Rochester as a Handler Scholar, hoping to learn more about public health and upon graduation, return to Nepal where she can help improve the healthcare system there and people's understanding of things like preventative medicine and overall health. She also sited the open curriculum at the University as a major factor in coming here, and the opportunity to study public health as an undergraduate. She is also considering a second major in either data science or economics. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Pursuing Their Passions: Class of 2022

 Yıl önce

 As the academic year begins, we welcome the class of 2022 by introducing just a handful of its members. Olivia Alger is an English major from Lake Bluff, Illinois, just outside of Chicago. She says that despite getting rejection letters when she applied for college as a high school senior, she didn't let it discourage her. She took a gap year, part of which she spent in France teaching refugees, an experience that was not without its challenges, but one she loved. Having found a passion for writing from an early age, she came across Rochester and found immediate support for her goals and aspirations and is excited to find a new community from the diverse campus here. Lucy Farnham grew up right here in Rochester, attending Wilson Magnet High School, where she took part in the International Baccalaureate program. She plans to major in Spanish, and possibly Japanese as a second major. The international makeup of campus and the Rochester Curriculum were big draws for her, allowing her to explore what most interests her and her love of different cultures. She says that although her mother attended college, she never finished, so being the first in her family to earn a college degree would be an honor for her, and for her parents who have been a huge support in getting here. Adrian Jackson is from Austin, Texas and is a viola performance major at the Eastman School of Music. He didn't start playing the viola until the middle of his freshman year in high school, but with some hard work, he managed to land at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, and ultimately get accepted at Eastman. He's the first in his family to attend college and says coming to Eastman is a dream come true, to be able to perform the classical repertoire that has become his passion. Befikadu Mekonnen is a biomedical engineering major from Nazaret, Ethiopia. His connection to the University goes back a few years when a mysterious illness left him and his parents searching for answers and not finding many, until he met Dr. RIck Hodes, a 1982 graduate of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Dr. Hodes lives and works in Ethiopia, and turned out to be one of the few people able to diagnose Befikadu with rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbit, a type of cancer in his eye. Thanks to Dr. Hodes and the tests done at the URMC pathology department, Befikadu got his life saving treatment in the US. He says that connection led him here, where he hopes to study medicine and help people, just like Dr. Hodes helped him. Prajita Shrestha is an epidemiology major from Kathmandu, Nepal. She comes to Rochester as a Handler Scholar, hoping to learn more about public health and upon graduation, return to Nepal where she can help improve the healthcare system there and people's understanding of things like preventative medicine and overall health. She also sited the open curriculum at the University as a major factor in coming here, and the opportunity to study public health as an undergraduate. She is also considering a second major in either data science or economics. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Meeting the Class of 2022 on Move-In Day

 For the Class of 2022, the adventure begins! August 22, 2018, marked Move-In Day for our domestic first-year students. Hundreds of volunteers were on hand to help incoming students settle in to their new home on campus. Students and families waiting to register in Park Lot were entertained by a cappella groups, the Pep Band, Rocky, and other sights and sounds that are a familiar part of campus. Between serenades, we took a few moments to learn something about our newest Yellowjackets. Welcome to Rochester! #UR2022 Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/kwCu/

Meeting the Class of 2022 on Move-In Day

 Yıl önce

 For the Class of 2022, the adventure begins! August 22, 2018, marked Move-In Day for our domestic first-year students. Hundreds of volunteers were on hand to help incoming students settle in to their new home on campus. Students and families waiting to register in Park Lot were entertained by a cappella groups, the Pep Band, Rocky, and other sights and sounds that are a familiar part of campus. Between serenades, we took a few moments to learn something about our newest Yellowjackets. Welcome to Rochester! #UR2022 Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/kwCu/

Move-in 2018: Rain or shine, we welcome the class of 2022 in style

 Arriving at a new school, in a new city, perhaps in a place where you don't know anyone yet, can produces some nerves. And having to move all your stuff on top of that? No fun. Except in Rochester. A cappella groups, brass bands, jugglers, and unicycles greet first-year students and their families in the parking lot, and that's only the beginning. As cars arrive at the dorms, each one is greeted by a chorus of cheers from student workers who are ready and waiting to unload all of your belongings and deliver them to your room in a matter of minutes. It's all part of the move-in day experience in Rochester and we have it down to a science. It's the first among many traditions that will make this place feel like home before you know it. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/ktW5/

Move-in 2018: Rain or shine, we welcome the class of 2022 in style

 Yıl önce

 Arriving at a new school, in a new city, perhaps in a place where you don't know anyone yet, can produces some nerves. And having to move all your stuff on top of that? No fun. Except in Rochester. A cappella groups, brass bands, jugglers, and unicycles greet first-year students and their families in the parking lot, and that's only the beginning. As cars arrive at the dorms, each one is greeted by a chorus of cheers from student workers who are ready and waiting to unload all of your belongings and deliver them to your room in a matter of minutes. It's all part of the move-in day experience in Rochester and we have it down to a science. It's the first among many traditions that will make this place feel like home before you know it. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/ktW5/

Three of a Kind: Triplets bring their Rochester story full circle

 On the morning of November 12, 1999, a Rochester couple became parents for the first time. And again, four hours later. And again, five minutes after that. The triplets were born at 29 weeks gestation-11 weeks premature-and weighed a combined 6.3 pounds. “They were so small you could hold one in your hand,” Jay Gelb says. Doctors at Strong Memorial Hospital called the triplets Baby A, Baby B, and Baby C, and cautioned the parents not to give them real names for several weeks. They had less than a 50 percent chance of survival, and the bereavement for “named” infants would be longer and more painful, they cautioned. “At 29 weeks, there’s no real viability,” Sandra Gelb '89 says. “It was a very scary time.” The triplets spent three months at Strong’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Sandra took the day shift, and Jay stayed nights. “Finally,” Jay Gelb says, “we got to take our babies home.” In August, Matthew, Nicole, and Robert Gelb will enroll at the University of Rochester as part of the Class of 2022-literally across the street from where they were born. “It feels like we’ve come full circle,” Nicole says. “We’re NICU graduates.” All three applied to and were admitted Early Decision to Rochester’s largest and most competitive Early Decision cohort yet. As members of the Class of 2022, they’ll be part of the most selective class ever to enter the College, from among a record 20,000-plus applicants. Matthew and Robert will enroll in the Barry Florescue Undergraduate Business Program, aspiring to follow their father into the banking business. Nicole plans to become a special education teacher. All three have been avid swimmers since age five and plan to join Rochester’s varsity team this fall. The triplets continue a deep family connection to the University. In addition to their mother, who earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology, their maternal great-grandmother, Anne Wolk ’58, who died in 2003, graduated from Rochester. And their grandfather, Allan Wolk, who died in 2012, was a professor at the Simon Business School for 41 years. “He’d be very happy we are continuing the family tradition at Rochester,” Nicole says. “He always loved the University.” Wolk taught his grandchildren the importance of community service, and Jay and Sandra reinforced it. Jay Gelb has been on the Golisano hospital board of directors for 18 years and is a member of the George Eastman Circle, the University’s leadership giving society. The Gelbs have purchased numerous Giraffe OmniBeds for Golisano through the years. The OmniBed pairs an incubator and radiant warmer to create a seamless healing microenvironment for babies. Last year, the triplets pooled their birthday and work money (and their parents matched them, dollar for dollar) to purchase another OmniBed. “We enjoy giving back,” Nicole says. “We realize how fortunate we are.” Nicole started a Golisano Children’s Club at her high school and organized a carnival last spring, bringing 10 of her fellow students to the hospital. The siblings also volunteer in a hospice home and work at the Jewish Home of Rochester, with duties ranging from manning the café to transporting residents from their rooms to activities to social visits. While Allan Wolk would be thrilled his only three grandchildren chose the school he loved, it was their choice to apply. They attended numerous summer sports camps at Rochester over the years, took courses last summer in the University’s pre-college programs, and will take a few classes this summer to get an early jump on their academic lives. “We looked at other places,” Nicole says, “but nothing could compare to Rochester.” It was also their choice to stay together. “We always do everything together,” Robert says. “We really don’t know anything different.” One thing is certain: the brothers won’t share a dorm room this fall. “We love being together,” Matthew says, “but it will be nice to make new friends.” Sandra and Jay will be empty nesters come August, but their kids will be around the corner and plan to visit often. The Gelb triplets are ready for a new chapter. “Their lives have come full circle,” Jay says. “When they were in kindergarten, they were in a play dressed as bumblebees. Who would’ve thought that bumblebees really grow up to become Yellowjackets?” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL66/

Three of a Kind: Triplets bring their Rochester story full circle

 Yıl önce

 On the morning of November 12, 1999, a Rochester couple became parents for the first time. And again, four hours later. And again, five minutes after that. The triplets were born at 29 weeks gestation-11 weeks premature-and weighed a combined 6.3 pounds. “They were so small you could hold one in your hand,” Jay Gelb says. Doctors at Strong Memorial Hospital called the triplets Baby A, Baby B, and Baby C, and cautioned the parents not to give them real names for several weeks. They had less than a 50 percent chance of survival, and the bereavement for “named” infants would be longer and more painful, they cautioned. “At 29 weeks, there’s no real viability,” Sandra Gelb '89 says. “It was a very scary time.” The triplets spent three months at Strong’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Sandra took the day shift, and Jay stayed nights. “Finally,” Jay Gelb says, “we got to take our babies home.” In August, Matthew, Nicole, and Robert Gelb will enroll at the University of Rochester as part of the Class of 2022-literally across the street from where they were born. “It feels like we’ve come full circle,” Nicole says. “We’re NICU graduates.” All three applied to and were admitted Early Decision to Rochester’s largest and most competitive Early Decision cohort yet. As members of the Class of 2022, they’ll be part of the most selective class ever to enter the College, from among a record 20,000-plus applicants. Matthew and Robert will enroll in the Barry Florescue Undergraduate Business Program, aspiring to follow their father into the banking business. Nicole plans to become a special education teacher. All three have been avid swimmers since age five and plan to join Rochester’s varsity team this fall. The triplets continue a deep family connection to the University. In addition to their mother, who earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology, their maternal great-grandmother, Anne Wolk ’58, who died in 2003, graduated from Rochester. And their grandfather, Allan Wolk, who died in 2012, was a professor at the Simon Business School for 41 years. “He’d be very happy we are continuing the family tradition at Rochester,” Nicole says. “He always loved the University.” Wolk taught his grandchildren the importance of community service, and Jay and Sandra reinforced it. Jay Gelb has been on the Golisano hospital board of directors for 18 years and is a member of the George Eastman Circle, the University’s leadership giving society. The Gelbs have purchased numerous Giraffe OmniBeds for Golisano through the years. The OmniBed pairs an incubator and radiant warmer to create a seamless healing microenvironment for babies. Last year, the triplets pooled their birthday and work money (and their parents matched them, dollar for dollar) to purchase another OmniBed. “We enjoy giving back,” Nicole says. “We realize how fortunate we are.” Nicole started a Golisano Children’s Club at her high school and organized a carnival last spring, bringing 10 of her fellow students to the hospital. The siblings also volunteer in a hospice home and work at the Jewish Home of Rochester, with duties ranging from manning the café to transporting residents from their rooms to activities to social visits. While Allan Wolk would be thrilled his only three grandchildren chose the school he loved, it was their choice to apply. They attended numerous summer sports camps at Rochester over the years, took courses last summer in the University’s pre-college programs, and will take a few classes this summer to get an early jump on their academic lives. “We looked at other places,” Nicole says, “but nothing could compare to Rochester.” It was also their choice to stay together. “We always do everything together,” Robert says. “We really don’t know anything different.” One thing is certain: the brothers won’t share a dorm room this fall. “We love being together,” Matthew says, “but it will be nice to make new friends.” Sandra and Jay will be empty nesters come August, but their kids will be around the corner and plan to visit often. The Gelb triplets are ready for a new chapter. “Their lives have come full circle,” Jay says. “When they were in kindergarten, they were in a play dressed as bumblebees. Who would’ve thought that bumblebees really grow up to become Yellowjackets?” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL66/

Rethinking the Interferometer for Femtosecond Lasers

 If you want to get the greatest benefit from a beam of light - whether to detect a distant planet or remedy an aberration in the human eye - you need to be able to measure its beam front information or wave front. Now a University of Rochester research team has devised a much simpler way to measure beams of light-- even powerful, superfast pulsed laser beams that require very complicated devices to characterize their properties. The new device will give scientists an unprecedented ability to fine tune even the quickest pulses of light for a host of applications, says Chunlei Guo, professor of optics, who has used femtosecond pulsed laser beams to treat metal surfaces in remarkable ways. And it could render traditional instruments for measuring light beams obsolete. “This is a revolutionary step forward,” says Guo. “In the past we’ve had to characterize light beams with very complicated, cumbersome interferometric devices, but now we can do it with just one optical cube. It is super compact, super reliable, and super robust.” The device, developed by Guo and Billy Lam, a PhD student in his lab, is described in Nature Light: Science and Applications. Called a wedged reversal shearing interferometer, it consists of a prism cube, assembled from two right-angle prisms. The cube has two angled entrances and splits the beam into two parts. When the beam exits the cube, the reflected light from the left portion of the beam and the transmitted light from the right portion of the beam are emitted from one face of the cube. Conversely, the transmitted light from left portion of the beam and reflected light from the right portion are emitted from another face of the cube. This creates an extremely stable “Interference” pattern for Guo and his team to measure all the key spatial characteristics of a light beam- its amplitude, phase, polarization, wavelength, and, in the case of pulsed beams, the duration of the pulses. And not just as an average along the entire beam, but at each point of the beam. This is especially important in imaging applications, Guo says. “If a beam is not perfect, and there is a defect on the image, it’s important to know the defect is because of the beam, and not because of a variation in the object you are imaging,” Guo says. “Ideally, you should have a perfect beam to do imaging. And if you don’t, you better know it, and then you can correct your measurements. Ultrafast lasers are key for recording dynamic processes, and having an extremely simple but robust device to characterize ultrafast or any type of laser beams are surely important.” Albert Michaelson demonstrated the first interferometer in the 1880s, using a beam splitter and two mirrors. The core principles remain the same in interferometers used today. The beam splitter sends the split light on different optical paths towards the mirrors. The mirrors then reflect each split beam back so they recombine at the beam splitter. The different paths taken by the two split beams causes a phase difference which creates an interference fringe pattern. This pattern is then analyzed by a detector to evaluate the wave characteristics. This approach has worked reasonably well for characterizing continuous wave laser beams because they have a long “coherence” time, allowing them to interfere even after being split, sent along two paths of different lengths, and then recombine, Guo says. However, given the short duration of a femtosecond pulsed laser beam - about a millionth of a billionth of a second - “Simple interferometer like the shear plate, where the beams reflected from the front and back surface interfere, no longer works.” Guo says. Femtosecond pulsed laser beams would quickly lose their coherence along non-equidistant pathways of a typical interferometer. The prism cube is designed in such a way to eliminate that problem, he says. The prism cube is the first single element interferometer that can characterize femtosecond or even shorter laser pulses. Femtosecond laser pulses offer two advantages. Their incredibly short duration is comparable to the timescales at which “very many fundamental processes in nature occur,” Guo says. Those processes include an electron moving around an atom’s core, the “lattice” vibration of atoms and molecules, and the unfolding of biological proteins. So, femtosecond last pulses provide researchers a tool to study and manipulate those processes. Femtosecond laser pulses are also incredibly powerful. “The peak power of a femtosecond laser pulse in my laboratory is equivalent to the entire North American power grid,” Guo says. That enables his lab to use the laser pulses to etch metal surfaces with new properties, so they become super water repellent or water attracting. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/kkLa/

Rethinking the Interferometer for Femtosecond Lasers

 Yıl önce

 If you want to get the greatest benefit from a beam of light - whether to detect a distant planet or remedy an aberration in the human eye - you need to be able to measure its beam front information or wave front. Now a University of Rochester research team has devised a much simpler way to measure beams of light-- even powerful, superfast pulsed laser beams that require very complicated devices to characterize their properties. The new device will give scientists an unprecedented ability to fine tune even the quickest pulses of light for a host of applications, says Chunlei Guo, professor of optics, who has used femtosecond pulsed laser beams to treat metal surfaces in remarkable ways. And it could render traditional instruments for measuring light beams obsolete. “This is a revolutionary step forward,” says Guo. “In the past we’ve had to characterize light beams with very complicated, cumbersome interferometric devices, but now we can do it with just one optical cube. It is super compact, super reliable, and super robust.” The device, developed by Guo and Billy Lam, a PhD student in his lab, is described in Nature Light: Science and Applications. Called a wedged reversal shearing interferometer, it consists of a prism cube, assembled from two right-angle prisms. The cube has two angled entrances and splits the beam into two parts. When the beam exits the cube, the reflected light from the left portion of the beam and the transmitted light from the right portion of the beam are emitted from one face of the cube. Conversely, the transmitted light from left portion of the beam and reflected light from the right portion are emitted from another face of the cube. This creates an extremely stable “Interference” pattern for Guo and his team to measure all the key spatial characteristics of a light beam- its amplitude, phase, polarization, wavelength, and, in the case of pulsed beams, the duration of the pulses. And not just as an average along the entire beam, but at each point of the beam. This is especially important in imaging applications, Guo says. “If a beam is not perfect, and there is a defect on the image, it’s important to know the defect is because of the beam, and not because of a variation in the object you are imaging,” Guo says. “Ideally, you should have a perfect beam to do imaging. And if you don’t, you better know it, and then you can correct your measurements. Ultrafast lasers are key for recording dynamic processes, and having an extremely simple but robust device to characterize ultrafast or any type of laser beams are surely important.” Albert Michaelson demonstrated the first interferometer in the 1880s, using a beam splitter and two mirrors. The core principles remain the same in interferometers used today. The beam splitter sends the split light on different optical paths towards the mirrors. The mirrors then reflect each split beam back so they recombine at the beam splitter. The different paths taken by the two split beams causes a phase difference which creates an interference fringe pattern. This pattern is then analyzed by a detector to evaluate the wave characteristics. This approach has worked reasonably well for characterizing continuous wave laser beams because they have a long “coherence” time, allowing them to interfere even after being split, sent along two paths of different lengths, and then recombine, Guo says. However, given the short duration of a femtosecond pulsed laser beam - about a millionth of a billionth of a second - “Simple interferometer like the shear plate, where the beams reflected from the front and back surface interfere, no longer works.” Guo says. Femtosecond pulsed laser beams would quickly lose their coherence along non-equidistant pathways of a typical interferometer. The prism cube is designed in such a way to eliminate that problem, he says. The prism cube is the first single element interferometer that can characterize femtosecond or even shorter laser pulses. Femtosecond laser pulses offer two advantages. Their incredibly short duration is comparable to the timescales at which “very many fundamental processes in nature occur,” Guo says. Those processes include an electron moving around an atom’s core, the “lattice” vibration of atoms and molecules, and the unfolding of biological proteins. So, femtosecond last pulses provide researchers a tool to study and manipulate those processes. Femtosecond laser pulses are also incredibly powerful. “The peak power of a femtosecond laser pulse in my laboratory is equivalent to the entire North American power grid,” Guo says. That enables his lab to use the laser pulses to etch metal surfaces with new properties, so they become super water repellent or water attracting. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/kkLa/

One Community - Diverse Voices

 Several University of Rochester students share aspects of their identities in this video that was produced for the Paul J. Burgett Intercultural Center's (BIC) 2015 One Community program. The One Community program engages students in a facilitated discussion that explores the way the University of Rochester community is shaped by all of our intersecting identities. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL68/

One Community - Diverse Voices

 Yıl önce

 Several University of Rochester students share aspects of their identities in this video that was produced for the Paul J. Burgett Intercultural Center's (BIC) 2015 One Community program. The One Community program engages students in a facilitated discussion that explores the way the University of Rochester community is shaped by all of our intersecting identities. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL68/

One Community

 This video describes the history of the Paul J. Burgett Intercultural Center's (BIC) One Community program and highlights key community members that were initially involved. The One Community program engages students in a facilitated discussion that explores the way the University of Rochester community is shaped by all of our intersecting identities. (recorded in 2014) ---About the One Community program--- The program is held during orientation and begins with an hour-long session during which current students share narratives about the ways their various identities have positively and negatively affected their college experience. This session is followed by student-facilitated small group discussions where participants explore the presentations and reflect on their own experiences. One Community provides first-year students with an opportunity to: • Spend time thinking carefully about their own identities • Learn about other students’ experiences The program also helps to provide students with tools to address situations that inevitably arise from difficult topics such as race, class, ability, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and other identity markers. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/jvTc/

One Community

 Yıl önce

 This video describes the history of the Paul J. Burgett Intercultural Center's (BIC) One Community program and highlights key community members that were initially involved. The One Community program engages students in a facilitated discussion that explores the way the University of Rochester community is shaped by all of our intersecting identities. (recorded in 2014) ---About the One Community program--- The program is held during orientation and begins with an hour-long session during which current students share narratives about the ways their various identities have positively and negatively affected their college experience. This session is followed by student-facilitated small group discussions where participants explore the presentations and reflect on their own experiences. One Community provides first-year students with an opportunity to: • Spend time thinking carefully about their own identities • Learn about other students’ experiences The program also helps to provide students with tools to address situations that inevitably arise from difficult topics such as race, class, ability, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and other identity markers. Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/jvTc/

Could alien civilizations predict the fate of our planet?

 As a civilization’s population grows, it uses more and more of its planet’s resources. By consuming the planet’s resources, the civilization then changes the conditions of the planet. Thinking about a civilization evolving together with its play is key, therefore, because the fate of our own civilization depends on how we use Earth’s resources. In order to illustrate the cooperative population-planet system, astrophysicist Adam Frank and his collaborators have, for the first time, developed a mathematical model that shows the possible ways a civilization and its planet can evolve together. Right now the equations are theoretical, but by thinking of civilizations and planets-even alien ones-as a whole, researchers can better decide what we might do as a species to survive. “The point is to recognize that driving climate change may be something generic,” says Frank, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester. “The laws of physics demand that any young population, by building an energy-intensive civilization like ours, is going to have feedback on its planet. Seeing climate change in this cosmic context may give us better insight on what’s happening to us now and how to deal with it.” Frank and fellow researchers Martina Alberti of the University of Washington and Axel Kleidon of the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, as well as Jonathan Carroll-Nellenback, a postdoctoral associate at Rochester, published their findings in the journal Astrobiology. Using the mathematical models, the researchers suggest four scenarios that might occur in a population-planet system: 1. Die-off: The population and the planet’s state (indicated by temperature) rise very quickly. Eventually, the population declines because there are not enough resources. There is still a population, but it is only a portion of what it was at its peak. “Imagine if 7 out of 10 people you knew died quickly,” Frank says. 2. Sustainability: The population and the temperature steadily rise. The population recognizes it is having a negative effect on the planet and switches from using high-impact resources, such as oil, to low-impact resources, such as solar. Both the population and the civilization level off without any catastrophic effects. 3. Collapse without resource change: The population and temperature both rise, so much so that the population collapses and the species becomes extinct. 4. Collapse with resource change: The population and the temperature rise, and the population recognizes it is causing a problem and switches from high-impact resources to low-impact resources. But the response comes too late, and the population collapses anyway. “The last scenario is the most frightening,” Frank says. “Even if you did the right thing, if you waited too long, you could still have your population collapse.” The researchers created their models based in part on case studies of extinct civilizations, such as the inhabitants of Easter Island. People began colonizing the island between 400 and 700 AD, and grew to a peak population of 10,000 sometime between 1200 and 1500 AD. By the 18th century, however, the inhabitants had depleted their resources and the population dropped drastically to about 2,000 people. The Easter Island population die-off relates to a concept called carrying capacity, or the maximum number of species an environment can support. In the researchers’ models, the carrying capacity depends on the health of the host planet, which is determined by the planet’s temperature. The higher the temperature, the lower the number of people the planet can support, and the lower the carrying capacity. But carrying capacity is not fixed. It can be higher or lower, depending on the actions of the population. That makes it hard to predict the earth’s carrying capacity, but “estimates are between 10 and 20 billion,” Frank says. “We’re at 7 billion now, and we’re expected to be at 10 billion in about 30 years. So we’re coming close to the projected carrying capacity.” Right now researchers can’t definitively predict the fate of the earth. The next steps will be to use more detailed models of the way planets behave when a civilization consumes energy of any form to grow. In the meantime, Frank issues a sober warning. “If you change the earth’s climate enough, you might not be able to change it back,” he says. “Even if you backed off and started to use solar or another less impactful resources, it could be too late, because the planet has already been changing. These models show we can’t just think about a population evolving on its own. We have to think about our planets and civilizations co-evolving.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Could alien civilizations predict the fate of our planet?

 Yıl önce

 As a civilization’s population grows, it uses more and more of its planet’s resources. By consuming the planet’s resources, the civilization then changes the conditions of the planet. Thinking about a civilization evolving together with its play is key, therefore, because the fate of our own civilization depends on how we use Earth’s resources. In order to illustrate the cooperative population-planet system, astrophysicist Adam Frank and his collaborators have, for the first time, developed a mathematical model that shows the possible ways a civilization and its planet can evolve together. Right now the equations are theoretical, but by thinking of civilizations and planets-even alien ones-as a whole, researchers can better decide what we might do as a species to survive. “The point is to recognize that driving climate change may be something generic,” says Frank, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester. “The laws of physics demand that any young population, by building an energy-intensive civilization like ours, is going to have feedback on its planet. Seeing climate change in this cosmic context may give us better insight on what’s happening to us now and how to deal with it.” Frank and fellow researchers Martina Alberti of the University of Washington and Axel Kleidon of the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, as well as Jonathan Carroll-Nellenback, a postdoctoral associate at Rochester, published their findings in the journal Astrobiology. Using the mathematical models, the researchers suggest four scenarios that might occur in a population-planet system: 1. Die-off: The population and the planet’s state (indicated by temperature) rise very quickly. Eventually, the population declines because there are not enough resources. There is still a population, but it is only a portion of what it was at its peak. “Imagine if 7 out of 10 people you knew died quickly,” Frank says. 2. Sustainability: The population and the temperature steadily rise. The population recognizes it is having a negative effect on the planet and switches from using high-impact resources, such as oil, to low-impact resources, such as solar. Both the population and the civilization level off without any catastrophic effects. 3. Collapse without resource change: The population and temperature both rise, so much so that the population collapses and the species becomes extinct. 4. Collapse with resource change: The population and the temperature rise, and the population recognizes it is causing a problem and switches from high-impact resources to low-impact resources. But the response comes too late, and the population collapses anyway. “The last scenario is the most frightening,” Frank says. “Even if you did the right thing, if you waited too long, you could still have your population collapse.” The researchers created their models based in part on case studies of extinct civilizations, such as the inhabitants of Easter Island. People began colonizing the island between 400 and 700 AD, and grew to a peak population of 10,000 sometime between 1200 and 1500 AD. By the 18th century, however, the inhabitants had depleted their resources and the population dropped drastically to about 2,000 people. The Easter Island population die-off relates to a concept called carrying capacity, or the maximum number of species an environment can support. In the researchers’ models, the carrying capacity depends on the health of the host planet, which is determined by the planet’s temperature. The higher the temperature, the lower the number of people the planet can support, and the lower the carrying capacity. But carrying capacity is not fixed. It can be higher or lower, depending on the actions of the population. That makes it hard to predict the earth’s carrying capacity, but “estimates are between 10 and 20 billion,” Frank says. “We’re at 7 billion now, and we’re expected to be at 10 billion in about 30 years. So we’re coming close to the projected carrying capacity.” Right now researchers can’t definitively predict the fate of the earth. The next steps will be to use more detailed models of the way planets behave when a civilization consumes energy of any form to grow. In the meantime, Frank issues a sober warning. “If you change the earth’s climate enough, you might not be able to change it back,” he says. “Even if you backed off and started to use solar or another less impactful resources, it could be too late, because the planet has already been changing. These models show we can’t just think about a population evolving on its own. We have to think about our planets and civilizations co-evolving.” Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Can you tell when someone is lying to you?

 Someone is fidgeting in a long line at an airport security gate. Is that person simply nervous about the wait? Or is this a passenger who has something sinister to hide? Even highly trained TSA (Transportation Security Administration) airport security officers still have a hard time telling whether someone is lying or telling the truth - despite the billions of dollars and years of study that have been devoted to the subject. Now, University of Rochester researchers are using data science and an online crowdsourcing to create a screening system that can more accurately detect deception based on facial and verbal cues. They also hope to minimize instances of racial and ethnic profiling that TSA critics contend often occurs when passengers are pulled aside under the agency’s Screening of Passengers by Observation Techniques (SPOT) program. “Basically, our system is like Skype on steroids,” says Tay Sen, a PhD student in the lab of Ehsan Hoque, an assistant professor of computer science. Sen is lead author of two new papers accepted for major computing conferences hosted by IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electrionics Engineers) and ACM (Association for Computing Machinery). The papers describe the framework the lab has used to create the largest video deception dataset so far -- and why some smiles are more deceitful than others. “A lot of times people tend to look a certain way or show some kind of facial expression when they’re remembering things,” Sen said. “And when they are given a computational question, they have another kind of facial expression.” An advantage of the crowdsourcing approach is that allows researchers to tap into a far larger pool of research participants, and gather data far more quickly, than would occur if participants had to be brought into a lab, Hoque says. So far, the researchers have gathered 1.3 million frames of facial expressions from 151 pairs of individuals (dyads) playing the game. Data science is enabling the researchers to quickly analyze all that data in novel ways. For example, they used facial feature analysis software to identify which of 43 facial muscles were being used in a given frame, and to assign a numerical weight to each. The researchers then fed the results into the University’s supercomputer, using a machine learning technique called clustering, which looks for patterns without being assigned any predetermined labels or categories. “It told us there were basically five kinds of smile-related ‘faces’ that people made when responding to questions,” Sen said. The one most frequently associated with lying was a high intensity version of the so-called Duchenne smile involving both cheek/eye and mouth muscles. This is consistent with the “Duping Delight” theory that “when you’re fooling someone, you tend to take delight in it,” Sen explained. More puzzling was the discovery that honest witnesses would often contract their eyes, but not smile at all with their mouths. “When we went back and replayed the videos, we found that this often happened when people were trying to remember [something]” Sen said. “This showed they were concentrating and trying to recall honestly.” So will these findings tip off liars to simply change their facial expressions? Not likely. The tell-tale strong Duchenne smile associated with lying involves “a cheek muscle you cannot control,” Hoque says. “It is involuntary.” “In the end, we still want humans to make the final decision,” Hoque says. “But as they are interrogating, it is important to provide them with some objective metrics that they could use to further inform their decisions.” Md Kamrul Hasan, Zachary Teicher, Minh Tran, Matthew Levin, Yiming Yang, Kurt Haut, and Raiyan Baten - all students in the Hoque lab - also contributed to the research. Students featured in the video (in order of appearance): Diana Maloku '21, Kurtis Haut '18, Shagun Bose '20, Manny Rodriguez '18, Ethan Wei '19, Melissa Kagaju '20. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL6g/

Can you tell when someone is lying to you?

 Yıl önce

 Someone is fidgeting in a long line at an airport security gate. Is that person simply nervous about the wait? Or is this a passenger who has something sinister to hide? Even highly trained TSA (Transportation Security Administration) airport security officers still have a hard time telling whether someone is lying or telling the truth - despite the billions of dollars and years of study that have been devoted to the subject. Now, University of Rochester researchers are using data science and an online crowdsourcing to create a screening system that can more accurately detect deception based on facial and verbal cues. They also hope to minimize instances of racial and ethnic profiling that TSA critics contend often occurs when passengers are pulled aside under the agency’s Screening of Passengers by Observation Techniques (SPOT) program. “Basically, our system is like Skype on steroids,” says Tay Sen, a PhD student in the lab of Ehsan Hoque, an assistant professor of computer science. Sen is lead author of two new papers accepted for major computing conferences hosted by IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electrionics Engineers) and ACM (Association for Computing Machinery). The papers describe the framework the lab has used to create the largest video deception dataset so far -- and why some smiles are more deceitful than others. “A lot of times people tend to look a certain way or show some kind of facial expression when they’re remembering things,” Sen said. “And when they are given a computational question, they have another kind of facial expression.” An advantage of the crowdsourcing approach is that allows researchers to tap into a far larger pool of research participants, and gather data far more quickly, than would occur if participants had to be brought into a lab, Hoque says. So far, the researchers have gathered 1.3 million frames of facial expressions from 151 pairs of individuals (dyads) playing the game. Data science is enabling the researchers to quickly analyze all that data in novel ways. For example, they used facial feature analysis software to identify which of 43 facial muscles were being used in a given frame, and to assign a numerical weight to each. The researchers then fed the results into the University’s supercomputer, using a machine learning technique called clustering, which looks for patterns without being assigned any predetermined labels or categories. “It told us there were basically five kinds of smile-related ‘faces’ that people made when responding to questions,” Sen said. The one most frequently associated with lying was a high intensity version of the so-called Duchenne smile involving both cheek/eye and mouth muscles. This is consistent with the “Duping Delight” theory that “when you’re fooling someone, you tend to take delight in it,” Sen explained. More puzzling was the discovery that honest witnesses would often contract their eyes, but not smile at all with their mouths. “When we went back and replayed the videos, we found that this often happened when people were trying to remember [something]” Sen said. “This showed they were concentrating and trying to recall honestly.” So will these findings tip off liars to simply change their facial expressions? Not likely. The tell-tale strong Duchenne smile associated with lying involves “a cheek muscle you cannot control,” Hoque says. “It is involuntary.” “In the end, we still want humans to make the final decision,” Hoque says. “But as they are interrogating, it is important to provide them with some objective metrics that they could use to further inform their decisions.” Md Kamrul Hasan, Zachary Teicher, Minh Tran, Matthew Levin, Yiming Yang, Kurt Haut, and Raiyan Baten - all students in the Hoque lab - also contributed to the research. Students featured in the video (in order of appearance): Diana Maloku '21, Kurtis Haut '18, Shagun Bose '20, Manny Rodriguez '18, Ethan Wei '19, Melissa Kagaju '20. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/BBL6g/

2018 Commencement: Eastman School of Music Ceremony Highlights

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the Eastman School of Music, held at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre on May 20, 2018. The speaker for the occasion was Jane Chu, chairman for the National Endowment for the Arts. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2018 Commencement: Eastman School of Music Ceremony Highlights

 Yıl önce

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the Eastman School of Music, held at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre on May 20, 2018. The speaker for the occasion was Jane Chu, chairman for the National Endowment for the Arts. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2018 Commencement: Arts, Sciences & Engineering Ceremony Highlights

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for Arts, Sciences & Engineering, which took place on Eastman Quadrangle on May 20, 2018. The speaker for the occasion was Margaret Georgiadis, CEO of Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

2018 Commencement: Arts, Sciences & Engineering Ceremony Highlights

 Yıl önce

 Highlights from the commencement ceremony for Arts, Sciences & Engineering, which took place on Eastman Quadrangle on May 20, 2018. The speaker for the occasion was Margaret Georgiadis, CEO of Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Behind the Scenes of Commencement Setup

 Every year on the third Sunday in May, the University of Rochester holds its commencement ceremonies. Since 1996, those ceremonies for the College of Arts, Sciences, & Engineering have been held outdoors on Eastman Quadrangle, beneath the stately backdrop of Rush Rhees Library. A ceremony of this size for around eight or nine thousand people requires a lot of advance preparation and setup. That's where the crews from University Facilities and Services, Event and Classroom Management, and a whole host of vendors come in. While Facilities lays the groundwork of getting the campus into shape-mulching, planting, mowing and general cleanup-weeks before commencement, vendors like Hale Northeast Inc. do the work of setting up all the chairs (around 7,500 of them), staging, ropes, and flooring that will accommodate all the graduates, faculty, and their families. In addition, the quad is rigged with giant video screens for viewers sitting farther from the stage, a full audio and video setup for a multi-camera simulcast and live-stream, and all the tents, tables, and chairs for the receptions that follow graduation ceremonies.That's where Event and Classroom Management comes in, coordinating and managing diploma ceremonies for each academic department, fanned out across the entire campus. Get a behind the scenes look at how this five day process of setting up the quad plays out, and all the challenges that come with it, from the scale of an undertaking like this to dealing with unpredictable weather.

Behind the Scenes of Commencement Setup

 Yıl önce

 Every year on the third Sunday in May, the University of Rochester holds its commencement ceremonies. Since 1996, those ceremonies for the College of Arts, Sciences, & Engineering have been held outdoors on Eastman Quadrangle, beneath the stately backdrop of Rush Rhees Library. A ceremony of this size for around eight or nine thousand people requires a lot of advance preparation and setup. That's where the crews from University Facilities and Services, Event and Classroom Management, and a whole host of vendors come in. While Facilities lays the groundwork of getting the campus into shape-mulching, planting, mowing and general cleanup-weeks before commencement, vendors like Hale Northeast Inc. do the work of setting up all the chairs (around 7,500 of them), staging, ropes, and flooring that will accommodate all the graduates, faculty, and their families. In addition, the quad is rigged with giant video screens for viewers sitting farther from the stage, a full audio and video setup for a multi-camera simulcast and live-stream, and all the tents, tables, and chairs for the receptions that follow graduation ceremonies.That's where Event and Classroom Management comes in, coordinating and managing diploma ceremonies for each academic department, fanned out across the entire campus. Get a behind the scenes look at how this five day process of setting up the quad plays out, and all the challenges that come with it, from the scale of an undertaking like this to dealing with unpredictable weather.

What's Next for the Class of 2018

 Some of our seniors from the Class of 2018 tell us what's next in their lives following graduation, and what they'll miss most about the University of Rochester. (We'll miss you too!)University of Rochester Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/i2tq/

What's Next for the Class of 2018

 Yıl önce

 Some of our seniors from the Class of 2018 tell us what's next in their lives following graduation, and what they'll miss most about the University of Rochester. (We'll miss you too!)University of Rochester Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/i2tq/

Gateways Music Festival: Inspiring Through the Power of Performance

 Imagine yourself in a concert hall. You close your eyes and let the sound of the orchestra onstage wash over you. You are transported by the sounds of Brahms, or Beethoven, or Mozart. When you open them, what do you see? In most cases, the faces of the musicians on stage are largely white, with a few exceptions. The experience at the Gateways Music Festival is something entirely different. The musicians that make up the orchestra and the chamber music ensembles that are part of the six-day festival-all 125 of them-are of African descent. They are among the top musicians in their field, coming to the Eastman School of Music from orchestras, ensembles, and music schools throughout the United States and beyond. While the organizers applaud efforts to make classical music more representative of the country as a whole, they are quick to point out that this is not a diversity initiative. Rather, this is about building community, offering a place for these musicians who are accustomed to being in the minority, and instead providing a venue to play music at the highest level, and focus on just the music. If in the process, they open some eyes about the number of professional classical musicians who look like them, that's a bonus. But the real goal is to inspire those in the audience by the power of the performance on the stage before them. The festival was started in 1993 in Winton Salem, North Carolina by Armenta Adams Hummings Dumisani, who brought it to Rochester in 1994 when she joined the faculty at the Eastman School of Music. It has been here ever since, and now with Gateways and Eastman formalizing their partnership, organizers hope the growth will only continue. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/iZzt/

Gateways Music Festival: Inspiring Through the Power of Performance

 Yıl önce

 Imagine yourself in a concert hall. You close your eyes and let the sound of the orchestra onstage wash over you. You are transported by the sounds of Brahms, or Beethoven, or Mozart. When you open them, what do you see? In most cases, the faces of the musicians on stage are largely white, with a few exceptions. The experience at the Gateways Music Festival is something entirely different. The musicians that make up the orchestra and the chamber music ensembles that are part of the six-day festival-all 125 of them-are of African descent. They are among the top musicians in their field, coming to the Eastman School of Music from orchestras, ensembles, and music schools throughout the United States and beyond. While the organizers applaud efforts to make classical music more representative of the country as a whole, they are quick to point out that this is not a diversity initiative. Rather, this is about building community, offering a place for these musicians who are accustomed to being in the minority, and instead providing a venue to play music at the highest level, and focus on just the music. If in the process, they open some eyes about the number of professional classical musicians who look like them, that's a bonus. But the real goal is to inspire those in the audience by the power of the performance on the stage before them. The festival was started in 1993 in Winton Salem, North Carolina by Armenta Adams Hummings Dumisani, who brought it to Rochester in 1994 when she joined the faculty at the Eastman School of Music. It has been here ever since, and now with Gateways and Eastman formalizing their partnership, organizers hope the growth will only continue. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/ Help us caption & translate this video! amara.org/v/iZzt/

Making Their Mark: Perspectives from the Class of 2018

 As the academic year comes to a close, we prepare to say goodbye to the graduating class of 2018 and send them on their way to the next chapter of their lives. Before doing so, we sat down and talked with a handful of them about their time in Rochester, what they will take with them and how these last four years have prepared them for what's next. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Making Their Mark: Perspectives from the Class of 2018

 Yıl önce

 As the academic year comes to a close, we prepare to say goodbye to the graduating class of 2018 and send them on their way to the next chapter of their lives. Before doing so, we sat down and talked with a handful of them about their time in Rochester, what they will take with them and how these last four years have prepared them for what's next. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Educating the Next Generation of Film Composers at Eastman

 The Beal Institute for Film Music and Contemporary Media was created at the Eastman School of Music in 2015, supported by a gift from Emmy-winning composer, Jeff Beal '85E and his wife Joan. Best known for the score of the Netflix series House of Cards, Jeff Beal sought to make Eastman a destination for the next generation of composers for film, television and new media. The Institute is led by Mark Watters, a 35 year veteran of TV and film scoring, having worked on hundreds of productions for the Walt Disney Company and been the music director for two Olympics, in Atlanta in 1996 and Salt Lake City in 2002. In the program, students have the opportunity to learn all aspects of composition, recording, and mixing scores for film, television, and video games. Students create original scores, then have the opportunity to record them with ensembles ranging from 5 or 6, all the way up to a full orchestration with more than 40 musicians. Faculty offer guidance throughout this process as students conduct and record their pieces with state of the art audio equipment and then work with an engineer to do the final mix on the score. The end goal is for graduates of the program to possess the full complement of skills and experience to begin working in this competitive industry, and the connections to get their career off the ground. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

Educating the Next Generation of Film Composers at Eastman

 Yıl önce

 The Beal Institute for Film Music and Contemporary Media was created at the Eastman School of Music in 2015, supported by a gift from Emmy-winning composer, Jeff Beal '85E and his wife Joan. Best known for the score of the Netflix series House of Cards, Jeff Beal sought to make Eastman a destination for the next generation of composers for film, television and new media. The Institute is led by Mark Watters, a 35 year veteran of TV and film scoring, having worked on hundreds of productions for the Walt Disney Company and been the music director for two Olympics, in Atlanta in 1996 and Salt Lake City in 2002. In the program, students have the opportunity to learn all aspects of composition, recording, and mixing scores for film, television, and video games. Students create original scores, then have the opportunity to record them with ensembles ranging from 5 or 6, all the way up to a full orchestration with more than 40 musicians. Faculty offer guidance throughout this process as students conduct and record their pieces with state of the art audio equipment and then work with an engineer to do the final mix on the score. The end goal is for graduates of the program to possess the full complement of skills and experience to begin working in this competitive industry, and the connections to get their career off the ground. Subscribe to the University of Rochester on TR-me: tr-me.com/users/UCZRLVZGCUZWYUEj2XQlFPyQ Follow the University of Rochester on Twitter: twitter.com/UofR Be sure to like the University of Rochester on our Facebook page: facebook.com/University.of.Rochester/

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